Attitudes toward mountain lion management in the Midwest: Implications for a potentially recolonizing large predator

Mae A. Davenport, Clayton K. Nielsen, Jean C. Mangun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mountain lion (Puma concolor) confirmations in the Midwest have increased considerably, indicating a potential recolonization event. Although the ecological, social, and economic implications of recolonization are of considerable interest to managers and the general public, no studies have yet assessed human attitudes toward mountain lion management in the region. We surveyed Kentucky and North Dakota residents and found differences in their mountain lion experience histories, beliefs, trust in information, and support for mountain lion management options. North Dakota respondents' support for mountain lion protection appeared to be a function of their basic normative beliefs, while Kentucky respondents were influenced more so by affective responses. Hunters in both groups were more likely to support mountain lion control than protection. As managers address potential recolonization of mountain lions in the Midwest through adaptive management strategies, targeted and proactive communication with diverse groups will be critical.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)373-388
Number of pages16
JournalHuman Dimensions of Wildlife
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 13 2010

Keywords

  • Attitudes
  • Mountain lions
  • Wildlife management

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