Attitudes and beliefs of family- and center-based child care providers predict differences in caregiving behavior over time

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15 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined how patterns of caregiving behavior differ between family and center providers over time, and to what extent caregivers’ attitudes and beliefs shape those caregiving patterns. Ninety-eight child care providers (59 family child care-based [family] and 39 center-based providers) self-reported their initial demographics, attitudes, and beliefs about children and caregiving. Their caregiving behavior in the child care setting was independently and reliably observed three times over the course of one year. When controlling for relevant demographic and structural variables, growth curve analyses revealed patterns of caregiving behavior that varied as a function of provider type and of the interaction between provider type and caregiver attitudes and beliefs. Center-based providers’ caregiving behavior was more heavily influenced by attitudes and beliefs and showed greater variability over time than family providers’ behavior. Implications for choosing child care and improving professional development are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)905-917
Number of pages13
JournalEarly Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Keywords

  • Attitudes and beliefs
  • Caregiving behavior
  • Center-based child care
  • Family child care
  • Infant–toddler care

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