Attenuation of the influenza virus by microRNA response element in vivo and protective efficacy against 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus in mice

Chunlai Feng, Mingming Tan, Wenkui Sun, Yi Shi, Zheng Xing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The 2009 influenza pandemics underscored the need for effective vaccines to block the spread of influenza virus infection. Most live attenuated vaccines utilize cold-adapted, temperature-sensitive virus. An alternative to live attenuated virus is presented here, based on microRNA-induced gene silencing. Methods: In this study, miR-let-7b target sequences were inserted into the H1N1 genome to engineer a recombinant virus - miRT-H1N1. Female BALB/c mice were vaccinated intranasally with the miRT-H1N1 and challenged with a lethal dose of homologous virus. Results: This miRT-H1N1 virus was attenuated in mice, while it exhibited wild-type characteristics in chicken embryos. Mice vaccinated intranasally with the miRT-H1N1 responded with robust immunity that protected the vaccinated mice from a lethal challenge with the wild-type 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. Conclusions: These results indicate that the influenza virus containing microRNA response elements (MREs) is attenuated in vivo and can be used to design a live attenuated vaccine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)146-152
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Infectious Diseases
Volume38
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported in part by the National Science Foundation of China (NSFC 81200063) and by a grant from the Hospital Foundation of Jinling Hospital (No. 2013021).

Keywords

  • H1N1
  • Immunogenicity
  • Influenza
  • Live attenuated vaccine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Attenuation of the influenza virus by microRNA response element in vivo and protective efficacy against 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus in mice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this