Attachment and affective resolution following a stressful event: General and religious coping as possible mediators

Michele A. Schottenbauer, Bonnie Klimes-Dougan, Benjamin F. Rodriguez, Diane B. Arnkoff, Carol R. Glass, V. Holland LaSalle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study replicated and extended previous research on mediators of attachment qualities and outcome (affective resolution), including appraisal, coping, and religious coping. Structural equation models were used to analyze the responses on an Internet survey for a primarily Christian sample of 1,289 adults (416 men and 873 women). As expected, appraisal was a significant mediator of ambivalent attachment qualities and coping, as well as ambivalent attachment qualities and religious coping. Avoidance coping significantly mediated ambivalent attachment qualities and affective resolution; it also mediated avoidant attachment qualities and affective resolution. Fit indices for models were adequate only when differences between interpersonal and non-interpersonal events were taken into account. Substantial similarities were found in the relationships among variables for the two models examined, one including coping in general and the other including religious coping. Religious coping provided additional explanatory value to more secular models of coping in a highly religious sample. The implications for assimilating religious coping into mainstream coping research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)448-471
Number of pages24
JournalMental Health, Religion and Culture
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

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