Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) as an important risk factor for the increased cardiovascular diseases and heart failure in chronic kidney disease

Xiaohong Liu, Xin Xu, Ruru Shang, Yingjie Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Patients with chronic kidney disease have an increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It has been recognized that the traditional cardiovascular risk factors could only partially explain the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and N-monomethy L-arginine (L-NMMA) are endogenous inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases that attenuate nitric oxide production and enhance reactive oxidative specie generation. Increased plasma ADMA and/or L-NMMA are strong and independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease, and various cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and heart failure. Both ADMA and L-NMMA are also eliminated from the body through either degradation by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase-1 (DDAH1) or urine excretion. This short review will exam the literature of ADMA and L-NMMA degradation and urine excretion, and the role of chronic kidney diseases in ADMA and L-NMMA accumulation and the increased cardiovascular disease risk. Based on all available data, it appears that the increased cardiovascular morbidity in chronic kidney disease may relate to the dramatic increase of systemic ADMA and L-NMMA after kidney failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-120
Number of pages8
JournalNitric Oxide - Biology and Chemistry
Volume78
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

Keywords

  • Asymmetric dimethylarginine
  • Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase-1
  • Heart failure
  • Kidney failure
  • Nitric oxide

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