Associations of serum carotenoid concentrations with the development of diabetes and with insulin concentration

Interaction with smoking: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

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Abstract

Smoking is associated with low serum carotenoid concentrations. Prospective studies have found lower diabetes risk among persons with high-carotenoid diets. Whether diabetes risk is low in the rare smoker who has high serum carotenoid levels is unknown. The authors investigated the interaction of serum carotenoid concentrations and smoking with diabetes mellitus in 4,493 Black and White men and women aged 18-30 years in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. The authors assessed 15-year (1985-2001) incident diabetes (148 cases), insulin concentration, and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment) in smokers and non-smokers according to baseline levels of serum α-carotene, β-carotene, zeaxanthin, β-cryptoxanthin, and lycopene. Diabetes incidence was inversely associated with the sum of carotenoid concentrations in nonsmokers (per standard deviation (SD) increase, relative hazard = 0.74, 95% confidence interval: 0.55, 0.99) but not in current smokers (relative hazard = 1.13, 95% confidence interval: 0.83, 1.53) (p for interaction = 0.02). Similarly, year 15 insulin and insulin resistance values, adjusted for baseline levels, were inversely related to sum of carotenoids only in nonsmokers (per SD increase in insulin level, slope = -0.46 (p = 0.03); per SD increase in insulin resistance, slope = -0.14 (p = 0.01)). In CARDIA, higher serum carotenoid concentrations are associated with lower risk of diabetes and insulin resistance in nonsmokers but not in smokers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)929-937
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume163
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2006

Fingerprint

Carotenoids
Young Adult
Coronary Vessels
Smoking
Insulin
Serum
Insulin Resistance
Confidence Intervals
Diabetes Mellitus
Homeostasis
Prospective Studies
Diet
Incidence

Keywords

  • Carotenoids
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Insulin resistance
  • Prospective studies
  • Smoking

Cite this

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title = "Associations of serum carotenoid concentrations with the development of diabetes and with insulin concentration: Interaction with smoking: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study",
abstract = "Smoking is associated with low serum carotenoid concentrations. Prospective studies have found lower diabetes risk among persons with high-carotenoid diets. Whether diabetes risk is low in the rare smoker who has high serum carotenoid levels is unknown. The authors investigated the interaction of serum carotenoid concentrations and smoking with diabetes mellitus in 4,493 Black and White men and women aged 18-30 years in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. The authors assessed 15-year (1985-2001) incident diabetes (148 cases), insulin concentration, and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment) in smokers and non-smokers according to baseline levels of serum α-carotene, β-carotene, zeaxanthin, β-cryptoxanthin, and lycopene. Diabetes incidence was inversely associated with the sum of carotenoid concentrations in nonsmokers (per standard deviation (SD) increase, relative hazard = 0.74, 95{\%} confidence interval: 0.55, 0.99) but not in current smokers (relative hazard = 1.13, 95{\%} confidence interval: 0.83, 1.53) (p for interaction = 0.02). Similarly, year 15 insulin and insulin resistance values, adjusted for baseline levels, were inversely related to sum of carotenoids only in nonsmokers (per SD increase in insulin level, slope = -0.46 (p = 0.03); per SD increase in insulin resistance, slope = -0.14 (p = 0.01)). In CARDIA, higher serum carotenoid concentrations are associated with lower risk of diabetes and insulin resistance in nonsmokers but not in smokers.",
keywords = "Carotenoids, Diabetes mellitus, Insulin resistance, Prospective studies, Smoking",
author = "Atsushi Hozawa and {Jacobs Jr}, {David R} and Steffes, {Michael W} and Gross, {Myron D} and Steffen, {Lyn M} and Lee, {Duk Hee}",
year = "2006",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/aje/kwj136",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "163",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations of serum carotenoid concentrations with the development of diabetes and with insulin concentration

T2 - Interaction with smoking: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

AU - Hozawa, Atsushi

AU - Jacobs Jr, David R

AU - Steffes, Michael W

AU - Gross, Myron D

AU - Steffen, Lyn M

AU - Lee, Duk Hee

PY - 2006/5/1

Y1 - 2006/5/1

N2 - Smoking is associated with low serum carotenoid concentrations. Prospective studies have found lower diabetes risk among persons with high-carotenoid diets. Whether diabetes risk is low in the rare smoker who has high serum carotenoid levels is unknown. The authors investigated the interaction of serum carotenoid concentrations and smoking with diabetes mellitus in 4,493 Black and White men and women aged 18-30 years in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. The authors assessed 15-year (1985-2001) incident diabetes (148 cases), insulin concentration, and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment) in smokers and non-smokers according to baseline levels of serum α-carotene, β-carotene, zeaxanthin, β-cryptoxanthin, and lycopene. Diabetes incidence was inversely associated with the sum of carotenoid concentrations in nonsmokers (per standard deviation (SD) increase, relative hazard = 0.74, 95% confidence interval: 0.55, 0.99) but not in current smokers (relative hazard = 1.13, 95% confidence interval: 0.83, 1.53) (p for interaction = 0.02). Similarly, year 15 insulin and insulin resistance values, adjusted for baseline levels, were inversely related to sum of carotenoids only in nonsmokers (per SD increase in insulin level, slope = -0.46 (p = 0.03); per SD increase in insulin resistance, slope = -0.14 (p = 0.01)). In CARDIA, higher serum carotenoid concentrations are associated with lower risk of diabetes and insulin resistance in nonsmokers but not in smokers.

AB - Smoking is associated with low serum carotenoid concentrations. Prospective studies have found lower diabetes risk among persons with high-carotenoid diets. Whether diabetes risk is low in the rare smoker who has high serum carotenoid levels is unknown. The authors investigated the interaction of serum carotenoid concentrations and smoking with diabetes mellitus in 4,493 Black and White men and women aged 18-30 years in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. The authors assessed 15-year (1985-2001) incident diabetes (148 cases), insulin concentration, and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment) in smokers and non-smokers according to baseline levels of serum α-carotene, β-carotene, zeaxanthin, β-cryptoxanthin, and lycopene. Diabetes incidence was inversely associated with the sum of carotenoid concentrations in nonsmokers (per standard deviation (SD) increase, relative hazard = 0.74, 95% confidence interval: 0.55, 0.99) but not in current smokers (relative hazard = 1.13, 95% confidence interval: 0.83, 1.53) (p for interaction = 0.02). Similarly, year 15 insulin and insulin resistance values, adjusted for baseline levels, were inversely related to sum of carotenoids only in nonsmokers (per SD increase in insulin level, slope = -0.46 (p = 0.03); per SD increase in insulin resistance, slope = -0.14 (p = 0.01)). In CARDIA, higher serum carotenoid concentrations are associated with lower risk of diabetes and insulin resistance in nonsmokers but not in smokers.

KW - Carotenoids

KW - Diabetes mellitus

KW - Insulin resistance

KW - Prospective studies

KW - Smoking

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U2 - 10.1093/aje/kwj136

DO - 10.1093/aje/kwj136

M3 - Article

VL - 163

SP - 929

EP - 937

JO - American Journal of Epidemiology

JF - American Journal of Epidemiology

SN - 0002-9262

IS - 10

ER -