Associations of changes in fat free mass with risk for type 2 diabetes: Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

M. N. LeCroy, S. Hua, R. C. Kaplan, D. Sotres-Alvarez, Q. Qi, B. Thyagarajan, L. C. Gallo, A. Pirzada, M. L. Daviglus, N. Schneiderman, G. A. Talavera, C. R. Isasi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aims: To determine whether loss of muscle mass (approximated using fat free mass [FFM]) is associated with risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Hispanic/Latino adults in the United States. Methods: Participants were Hispanic/Latino adults (18–74-year-olds) who completed Visit 2 of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL; multi-site, prospective cohort study; 6.1-year follow-up) and did not have T2DM at baseline (n = 6264). At baseline and Visit 2, FFM was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis and fasting glucose, HbA1c, and fasting insulin were measured by examiners. Diabetes was defined according to American Diabetes Association criteria. Survey-weighted Poisson regression models examined the association of percent change in relative FFM (%ΔFFM) with incident prediabetes and T2DM. Survey-weighted multivariable regression models examined associations of %ΔFFM with changes in glucose and insulin measures. Results: Relative FFM declined by 2.1% between visits. %ΔFFM was inversely associated with incident prediabetes (p-for-trend = 0.001) and with changes in glucose and insulin measures (p-for-trend <0.0001). Findings were null, except for HOMA-IR, after adjustment for changes in adiposity measures. Associations were generally stronger for individuals with baseline overweight/obesity. Conclusions: Reducing loss of FFM during adulthood may reduce prediabetes risk (primarily insulin resistance), particularly among individuals with overweight/obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number108557
JournalDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Volume171
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos was supported by contracts from the NHLBI to the University of North Carolina (N01-HC65233), University of Miami (N01-HC65234), Albert Einstein College of Medicine (N01-HC65235), the University of Illinois at Chicago (HHSN268201300003I), Northwestern University (N01-HC65236), and San Diego State University (N01-HC65237). The following Institutes/Centers/Offices contributed to the HCHS/SOL through a transfer of funds to NHLBI: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities, the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communications Disorders, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke, and the Office of Dietary Supplements. Additional support was provided by the Life Course Methodology Core (LCMC) at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the New York Regional Center for Diabetes Translation Research (P30 DK111022-8786 and P30 DK111022) through funds from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Support for the lead author was provided by an NHLBI training grant (T32-HL144456). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NHLBI or the National Institutes of Health.

Funding Information:
Funding: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos was supported by contracts from the NHLBI to the University of North Carolina (N01-HC65233), University of Miami (N01-HC65234), Albert Einstein College of Medicine (N01-HC65235), the University of Illinois at Chicago (HHSN268201300003I), Northwestern University (N01-HC65236), and San Diego State University (N01-HC65237). The following Institutes/Centers/Offices contributed to the HCHS/SOL through a transfer of funds to NHLBI: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities, the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communications Disorders, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke, and the Office of Dietary Supplements. Additional support was provided by the Life Course Methodology Core (LCMC) at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the New York Regional Center for Diabetes Translation Research (P30 DK111022-8786 and P30 DK111022) through funds from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Support for the lead author was provided by an NHLBI training grant (T32-HL144456). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NHLBI or the National Institutes of Health.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Adiposity
  • Hispanic
  • Prospective studies
  • Sarcopenia
  • Type 2 diabetes

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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