Associations of body mass index with incident hypertension in American white, American black and Chinese Asian adults in early and middle adulthood: The coronary artery risk development in young adults (CARDIA) study, the atherosclerosis risk in communities (ARIC) study and the people's republic of China (PRC) study

Eva G. Katz, June Stevens, Kimberly P. Truesdale, Jianwen Cai, Kari E. North, Lyn M. Steffen

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20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The association of body mass index (BMI) with blood pressure may be stronger in Asian than non-Asian populations, however, longitudinal studies with direct comparisons between ethnicities are lacking. We compared the relationship of BMI with incident hypertension over approximately 9.5 years of follow-up in young (24-39 years) and middle-aged (45-64 years) Chinese Asians (n=5354), American Blacks (n=6076) and American Whites (n=13451). We estimated risk differences using logistic regression models and calculated adjusted incidences and incidence differences. To facilitate comparisons across ethnicities, standardized estimates were calculated using mean covariate values for age, sex, smoking, education and field center, and included the quadratic terms for BMI and age. Weighted least-squares regression models with were constructed to summarize ethnic-specific incidence differences across BMI. Wald statistics and p-values were calculated based on chi-square distributions. The association of BMI with the incidence difference for hypertension was steeper in Chinese (p<0.05) than in American populations during young and middle-adulthood. For example, at a BMI of 25 vs 21 kg/m2 the adjusted incidence differences per 1000 persons (95% CI) in young adults with a BMI of 25 vs those with a BMI of 21 was 83 (36-130) for Chinese, 50 (26-74) for Blacks and 30 (12-48) for Whites; among middle-aged adults it was 137 (77-198) for Chinese, 49 (9-88) for Blacks and 54 (38-69) for Whites. Whether hypertension carries the same level of risk of stroke or cardiovascular disease across national or ethnic groups remains uncertain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)626-634
Number of pages9
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

Keywords

  • African american
  • Blood pressure
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Multi-ethnic
  • Obesity

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