Associations Between Peer Harassment and School Risk and Protection Profiles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Peer harassment can have serious implications for students' success and well-being, and prevention programs need to consider the school context. This study aimed to: (1) identify groups of similar schools based on their risk and protective factors and demographic characteristics and (2) examine associations between school profiles and students' bullying involvement. METHODS: Data came from 505 schools and 122,106 students who completed the 2013 Minnesota Student Survey. School-level risk and protective factors and demographic characteristics were included in a latent profile analysis (LPA) to identify profiles of schools. Multilevel logistic regression was used to assess associations between school profiles and peer harassment. RESULTS: Six qualitatively different school profiles were identified. Unadjusted models showed that schools with higher levels of risk had greater odds of peer harassment. However, after controlling for student-level risk and protection, regardless of school-level risk, students in metro-area schools with a more diverse student body reported lower odds of bullying involvement. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight the importance of the social environment into peer harassment. In addition to addressing student-level risk and protection, larger community factors and norms also need to be taken into account for developing, selecting, and implementing the most effective approaches to bullying prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)832-841
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of School Health
Volume87
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

Students
school
Bullying
student
exclusion
Peers
Harassment
Demography
student body
Social Environment
Logistic Models
well-being
logistics
regression
community
Group
Protective Factors
Demographics

Keywords

  • bullying
  • emotional health
  • program planning
  • school harassment
  • school health policy

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Associations Between Peer Harassment and School Risk and Protection Profiles. / Gloppen, Kari M.; Gower, Amy L; McMorris, Barbara J; Eisenberg, Marla E.

In: Journal of School Health, Vol. 87, No. 11, 01.11.2017, p. 832-841.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7992a763bccc4dd39f9c2aebdd5bce0f,
title = "Associations Between Peer Harassment and School Risk and Protection Profiles",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Peer harassment can have serious implications for students' success and well-being, and prevention programs need to consider the school context. This study aimed to: (1) identify groups of similar schools based on their risk and protective factors and demographic characteristics and (2) examine associations between school profiles and students' bullying involvement. METHODS: Data came from 505 schools and 122,106 students who completed the 2013 Minnesota Student Survey. School-level risk and protective factors and demographic characteristics were included in a latent profile analysis (LPA) to identify profiles of schools. Multilevel logistic regression was used to assess associations between school profiles and peer harassment. RESULTS: Six qualitatively different school profiles were identified. Unadjusted models showed that schools with higher levels of risk had greater odds of peer harassment. However, after controlling for student-level risk and protection, regardless of school-level risk, students in metro-area schools with a more diverse student body reported lower odds of bullying involvement. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight the importance of the social environment into peer harassment. In addition to addressing student-level risk and protection, larger community factors and norms also need to be taken into account for developing, selecting, and implementing the most effective approaches to bullying prevention.",
keywords = "bullying, emotional health, program planning, school harassment, school health policy",
author = "Gloppen, {Kari M.} and Gower, {Amy L} and McMorris, {Barbara J} and Eisenberg, {Marla E}",
year = "2017",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/josh.12557",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "87",
pages = "832--841",
journal = "Journal of School Health",
issn = "0022-4391",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations Between Peer Harassment and School Risk and Protection Profiles

AU - Gloppen, Kari M.

AU - Gower, Amy L

AU - McMorris, Barbara J

AU - Eisenberg, Marla E

PY - 2017/11/1

Y1 - 2017/11/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Peer harassment can have serious implications for students' success and well-being, and prevention programs need to consider the school context. This study aimed to: (1) identify groups of similar schools based on their risk and protective factors and demographic characteristics and (2) examine associations between school profiles and students' bullying involvement. METHODS: Data came from 505 schools and 122,106 students who completed the 2013 Minnesota Student Survey. School-level risk and protective factors and demographic characteristics were included in a latent profile analysis (LPA) to identify profiles of schools. Multilevel logistic regression was used to assess associations between school profiles and peer harassment. RESULTS: Six qualitatively different school profiles were identified. Unadjusted models showed that schools with higher levels of risk had greater odds of peer harassment. However, after controlling for student-level risk and protection, regardless of school-level risk, students in metro-area schools with a more diverse student body reported lower odds of bullying involvement. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight the importance of the social environment into peer harassment. In addition to addressing student-level risk and protection, larger community factors and norms also need to be taken into account for developing, selecting, and implementing the most effective approaches to bullying prevention.

AB - BACKGROUND: Peer harassment can have serious implications for students' success and well-being, and prevention programs need to consider the school context. This study aimed to: (1) identify groups of similar schools based on their risk and protective factors and demographic characteristics and (2) examine associations between school profiles and students' bullying involvement. METHODS: Data came from 505 schools and 122,106 students who completed the 2013 Minnesota Student Survey. School-level risk and protective factors and demographic characteristics were included in a latent profile analysis (LPA) to identify profiles of schools. Multilevel logistic regression was used to assess associations between school profiles and peer harassment. RESULTS: Six qualitatively different school profiles were identified. Unadjusted models showed that schools with higher levels of risk had greater odds of peer harassment. However, after controlling for student-level risk and protection, regardless of school-level risk, students in metro-area schools with a more diverse student body reported lower odds of bullying involvement. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight the importance of the social environment into peer harassment. In addition to addressing student-level risk and protection, larger community factors and norms also need to be taken into account for developing, selecting, and implementing the most effective approaches to bullying prevention.

KW - bullying

KW - emotional health

KW - program planning

KW - school harassment

KW - school health policy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85031028882&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85031028882&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/josh.12557

DO - 10.1111/josh.12557

M3 - Article

C2 - 29023840

AN - SCOPUS:85031028882

VL - 87

SP - 832

EP - 841

JO - Journal of School Health

JF - Journal of School Health

SN - 0022-4391

IS - 11

ER -