Associations between parental engagement in disordered eating behaviors and use of specific food parenting practices within a racially, ethnically, and socioeconomically diverse sample

K. A. Loth, E. Vomacka, V. M. Hazzard, A. Trofholz, J. M. Berge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Parents influence their children's eating behaviors through their use of food parenting practices, or goal-directed behaviors that guide both what and how they feed their child. Prior research suggests that parents who engage in disordered eating behaviors are more likely to use coercive food parenting practices, which are known to be associated with the development of maladaptive eating behaviors in young people. The present study sought to extend our current understanding by examining the association between parental engagement in disordered eating behaviors and use of a broader range of food parenting practices in a socioeconomically and racially diverse, population-based sample (n = 1306 parents/child dyads). Parents self-reported their disordered eating behaviors, as well as use of coercive and structure-based food parenting practices. A series of separate linear regression models, adjusting for parent and child sociodemographic and anthropometric characteristics, revealed that parents engaging in restrictive disordered eating behaviors and binge eating reported significantly higher levels of coercive food parenting practices, including pressure-to-eat, restriction, threats and bribes, and using food to control negative emotions. Parental engagement in restrictive disordered eating behaviors was also associated with significantly higher use of food rules and limits. Overall, parental engagement in compensatory disordered eating behaviors was significantly associated with higher levels of restrictive and emotional feeding practices, as well as with lower levels of monitoring. Given prior research supporting a relationship between exposure to coercive control food parenting practices and the development of maladaptive eating behaviors in young people, results from the current study provide support for the role that food parenting practices might play in the intergenerational transmission of disordered eating behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number107253
JournalAppetite
Volume195
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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