Associations between parent and child physical activity and eating behaviours in a diverse sample: An ecological momentary assessment study

Rachel Wirthlin, Jennifer A. Linde, Amanda Trofholz, Allan Tate, Katie Loth, Jerica M. Berge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This study is a secondary data analysis that examines the association between parent modelling of dietary intake and physical activity and the same child behaviours among different races/ethnicities using innovative, rigorous and objective measures.Design: Ecological momentary assessment surveys were sent to parents to assess whether their child had seen them exercise or consume food. Dietary recall data and accelerometry were used to determine dietary intake and physical activity behaviours of children.Setting: Participants were randomly selected from primary care clinics, serving low-income and racially/ethnically diverse families in Minnesota, USA.Participants: Participants were families with children aged 5-7 years old who lived with parents 50 % of the time and shared at least one meal together.Results: A 10 percentage point higher prevalence in parent modelling of fruit and vegetable intake was associated with 0·12 higher serving intake of those same foods in children. The prevalence of parent modelling of eating energy dense foods (10 % prevalence units) was associated with 0·09 higher serving intake of sugar-sweetened beverages. Furthermore, accelerometry-measured parent sedentary hours was strongly correlated with child sedentary time (0·37 child sedentary hours per parent sedentary hours). An exploratory interaction analysis did not reveal any statistical evidence that these relationships depended on the child's race/ethnic background.Conclusions: Interventions that increase parent modelling of healthy eating and minimise modelling of energy dense foods may have favourable effects on child dietary quality. Additionally, future research is needed to clarify the associations of parent modelling of physical activity and children's physical activity levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2728-2736
Number of pages9
JournalPublic health nutrition
Volume23
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgements: The Family Matters study is a team effort and could not have been accomplished without the dedicated staff who carried out the home visits, including Awo Ahmed, Nimo Ahmed, Rodolfo Batres, Carlos Chavez, Mia Donley, Michelle Draxten, Carrie Hanson-Bradley, Sulekha Ibrahim, Walter Novillo, Alejandra Ochoa, Luis ‘Marty’ Ortega, Anna Schulte, Hiba Sharif, Mai See Thao, Rebecca Tran, Bai Vue and Serena Xiong. Financial support: This research is supported by grant number 1R01HL126171 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (PI: Jerica Berge). Content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development or the National Institutes of Health. Conflict of interest: Authors have no conflicts of interest to report. Authorship: R.W.: Ms. Wirthlin performed this work to fulfill her Master’s in Public Health degree requirements at the University of Minnesota under the supervision of Drs. Berge, Linde and Loth. She was responsible for conceptualisation and drafting of the paper. She agrees to be accountable for all aspects of the work regarding the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work. J.M.B.: Dr. Berge is the primary investigator for the Family Matters Study and assisted with interpretation of results, gave final approval of this version to be published and agrees to be accountable for all aspects of the work regarding the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work. A.T.: Ms. Trofholz assisted with the conceptualisation of the paper, data analysis and data interpretation. She agrees to be accountable for all aspects of the work regarding the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work. A.T.: Mr. Tate assisted in the data analysis and interpretation for the paper. He agrees to be accountable for all aspects of the work regarding the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work. J.A.L.: Dr. Linde critically reviewed the paper and gave final approval of this version to be published and agrees to be accountable for all aspects of the work regarding the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work. K.L.: Dr. Loth critically reviewed the paper and gave final approval of this version to be published and agrees to be accountable for all aspects of the work regarding the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work. Ethics of human subject participation: This study was conducted according to the guidelines laid down in the Declaration of Helsinki, and all procedures involving research study participants were approved by the University of Minnesota Institutional Review Board. Written informed consent was obtained from all subjects/patients.

Funding Information:
This research is supported by grant number 1R01HL126171 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (PI: Jerica Berge). Content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development or the National Institutes of Health.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Healthy eating
  • Parent modelling
  • Physical activity
  • Race/ethnicity

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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