Association of testosterone and estradiol deficiency with osteoporosis and rapid bone loss in older men

Howard A. Fink, Susan K. Ewing, Kristine E. Ensrud, Elizabeth Barrett-Connor, Brent C. Taylor, Jane A. Cauley, Eric S. Orwoll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

208 Scopus citations

Abstract

Context: The clinical value of measuring testosterone and estradiol in older men with osteoporosis and of measuring bone mineral density (BMD) in older men with testosterone or estradiol deficiency is uncertain. Objective: The objective of the study was to examine the association of testosterone and estradiol deficiency with osteoporosis and rapid bone loss in older men. Design: This study was a cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis. Setting: The study was conducted at six U.S. centers of the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men study. Participants: The study population consisted of 2447 community-dwelling men aged 65 yr or older. Main Outcome Measures: Total testosterone deficiency was defined as less than 200 ng/dl. Total estradiol deficiency was defined as less than 10 pg/ml. Osteoporosis was defined as femoral neck or total hip BMD T-score of -2.5 or less. Rapid bone loss was defined as 3%/yr or more. Results: Prevalence of osteoporosis in men with deficient and normal total testosterone was 12.3 and 6.0% (P = 0.003) and 15.4 and 2.8% (P < 0.0001) in those with deficient and normal total estradiol. Among osteoporotic men and those with normal BMD, prevalence of total testosterone deficiency was 6.9 and 3.2% (P = 0.01), and prevalence of total estradiol deficiency was 9.2 and 2.4% (P = 0.0001). Incidence of rapid hip bone loss in men with deficient and normal total testosterone was 22.5 and 8.6% (P = 0.007) and in those with deficient and normal total estradiol was 14.3 and 6.3% (P = 0.08). Conclusions: Older men with total testosterone or estradiol deficiency were more likely to be osteoporotic. Those with osteoporosis were more likely to be total testosterone or estradiol deficient. Rapid hip bone loss was more likely in men with total testosterone deficiency. BMD testing of older men with sex steroid deficiency may be clinically warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3908-3915
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume91
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The MrOS is supported by the National Institutes of Health. The following institutes provide support: the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) under the following grants: U01 AR45580, U01 AR45614, U01 AR45632, U01 AR45647, U01 AR45654, U01 AR45583, U01 AG18197, and M01 RR000334. The National Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) provides funding for the MrOS dental ancillary study, Determinants of Periodontal Disease in Older Men, under Grant R01 DE014386.

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