Association of Life’s Simple 7 with reduced clinically manifest abdominal aortic aneurysm

The ARIC study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To optimize cardiovascular health, the American Heart Association (AHA) has recommended ‘Life’s Simple 7 (LS7)’. We tested the hypothesis that greater adherence to the LS7 cardiovascular risk metric is associated with reduced risk of developing abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). A total of 14,375 black and white participants aged 45–64 years at the baseline visit of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study cohort were included in this analysis. A 14-point summary score for LS7 was calculated, and participants were classified as having poor (0–4), average (5–9), or ideal (10–14) cardiovascular health. We also counted the number of ideal components. Poisson regression was used to calculate incidence rates for AAA, and Cox regression to calculate hazard ratios adjusted for age, race, sex, and socioeconomic status. Over 25 years of follow-up, we identified 545 clinically manifest AAA events. Incident rates per 1000 person-years declined markedly across LS7 categories: 3.4 for the ‘poor’ category, 2.2 for ‘average’, and 0.9 for ‘ideal’. Compared to individuals in the ‘poor’ LS7 category, individuals in the ‘average’ category had a 52% lower AAA risk (95% CI: 37% to 63%) and those in the ‘ideal’ category had an 80% lower risk (95% CI: 72% to 86%). For every additional ideal component, there was a 28% lower risk of AAA (95% CI: 23% to 33%). Greater adherence to the AHA’s LS7 cardiovascular risk metric is associated with a reduced risk of clinically manifest AAA. These findings support the recommendation to follow LS7 for primary prevention of AAA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)224-229
Number of pages6
JournalVascular Medicine (United Kingdom)
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

Fingerprint

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Atherosclerosis
Health
Primary Prevention
Social Class
Cohort Studies
Incidence

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study
  • Life’s Simple 7 (LS7)
  • abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)
  • epidemiology
  • primary prevention

Cite this

@article{9756d393e7c84a7fb70d4bfd09c8f8fa,
title = "Association of Life’s Simple 7 with reduced clinically manifest abdominal aortic aneurysm: The ARIC study",
abstract = "To optimize cardiovascular health, the American Heart Association (AHA) has recommended ‘Life’s Simple 7 (LS7)’. We tested the hypothesis that greater adherence to the LS7 cardiovascular risk metric is associated with reduced risk of developing abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). A total of 14,375 black and white participants aged 45–64 years at the baseline visit of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study cohort were included in this analysis. A 14-point summary score for LS7 was calculated, and participants were classified as having poor (0–4), average (5–9), or ideal (10–14) cardiovascular health. We also counted the number of ideal components. Poisson regression was used to calculate incidence rates for AAA, and Cox regression to calculate hazard ratios adjusted for age, race, sex, and socioeconomic status. Over 25 years of follow-up, we identified 545 clinically manifest AAA events. Incident rates per 1000 person-years declined markedly across LS7 categories: 3.4 for the ‘poor’ category, 2.2 for ‘average’, and 0.9 for ‘ideal’. Compared to individuals in the ‘poor’ LS7 category, individuals in the ‘average’ category had a 52{\%} lower AAA risk (95{\%} CI: 37{\%} to 63{\%}) and those in the ‘ideal’ category had an 80{\%} lower risk (95{\%} CI: 72{\%} to 86{\%}). For every additional ideal component, there was a 28{\%} lower risk of AAA (95{\%} CI: 23{\%} to 33{\%}). Greater adherence to the AHA’s LS7 cardiovascular risk metric is associated with a reduced risk of clinically manifest AAA. These findings support the recommendation to follow LS7 for primary prevention of AAA.",
keywords = "Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, Life’s Simple 7 (LS7), abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), epidemiology, primary prevention",
author = "Oyenuga, {Abayomi O.} and Folsom, {Aaron R} and Lutsey, {Pamela L} and Weihong Tang",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1358863X19829226",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "224--229",
journal = "Vascular Medicine (United Kingdom)",
issn = "1358-863X",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of Life’s Simple 7 with reduced clinically manifest abdominal aortic aneurysm

T2 - The ARIC study

AU - Oyenuga, Abayomi O.

AU - Folsom, Aaron R

AU - Lutsey, Pamela L

AU - Tang, Weihong

PY - 2019/6/1

Y1 - 2019/6/1

N2 - To optimize cardiovascular health, the American Heart Association (AHA) has recommended ‘Life’s Simple 7 (LS7)’. We tested the hypothesis that greater adherence to the LS7 cardiovascular risk metric is associated with reduced risk of developing abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). A total of 14,375 black and white participants aged 45–64 years at the baseline visit of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study cohort were included in this analysis. A 14-point summary score for LS7 was calculated, and participants were classified as having poor (0–4), average (5–9), or ideal (10–14) cardiovascular health. We also counted the number of ideal components. Poisson regression was used to calculate incidence rates for AAA, and Cox regression to calculate hazard ratios adjusted for age, race, sex, and socioeconomic status. Over 25 years of follow-up, we identified 545 clinically manifest AAA events. Incident rates per 1000 person-years declined markedly across LS7 categories: 3.4 for the ‘poor’ category, 2.2 for ‘average’, and 0.9 for ‘ideal’. Compared to individuals in the ‘poor’ LS7 category, individuals in the ‘average’ category had a 52% lower AAA risk (95% CI: 37% to 63%) and those in the ‘ideal’ category had an 80% lower risk (95% CI: 72% to 86%). For every additional ideal component, there was a 28% lower risk of AAA (95% CI: 23% to 33%). Greater adherence to the AHA’s LS7 cardiovascular risk metric is associated with a reduced risk of clinically manifest AAA. These findings support the recommendation to follow LS7 for primary prevention of AAA.

AB - To optimize cardiovascular health, the American Heart Association (AHA) has recommended ‘Life’s Simple 7 (LS7)’. We tested the hypothesis that greater adherence to the LS7 cardiovascular risk metric is associated with reduced risk of developing abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). A total of 14,375 black and white participants aged 45–64 years at the baseline visit of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study cohort were included in this analysis. A 14-point summary score for LS7 was calculated, and participants were classified as having poor (0–4), average (5–9), or ideal (10–14) cardiovascular health. We also counted the number of ideal components. Poisson regression was used to calculate incidence rates for AAA, and Cox regression to calculate hazard ratios adjusted for age, race, sex, and socioeconomic status. Over 25 years of follow-up, we identified 545 clinically manifest AAA events. Incident rates per 1000 person-years declined markedly across LS7 categories: 3.4 for the ‘poor’ category, 2.2 for ‘average’, and 0.9 for ‘ideal’. Compared to individuals in the ‘poor’ LS7 category, individuals in the ‘average’ category had a 52% lower AAA risk (95% CI: 37% to 63%) and those in the ‘ideal’ category had an 80% lower risk (95% CI: 72% to 86%). For every additional ideal component, there was a 28% lower risk of AAA (95% CI: 23% to 33%). Greater adherence to the AHA’s LS7 cardiovascular risk metric is associated with a reduced risk of clinically manifest AAA. These findings support the recommendation to follow LS7 for primary prevention of AAA.

KW - Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study

KW - Life’s Simple 7 (LS7)

KW - abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)

KW - epidemiology

KW - primary prevention

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85063339486&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85063339486&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1358863X19829226

DO - 10.1177/1358863X19829226

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 224

EP - 229

JO - Vascular Medicine (United Kingdom)

JF - Vascular Medicine (United Kingdom)

SN - 1358-863X

IS - 3

ER -