Association of Incident, Clinically Undiagnosed Radiographic Vertebral Fractures With Follow-Up Back Pain Symptoms in Older Men: the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study

for the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prior data in women suggest that incident clinically undiagnosed radiographic vertebral fractures (VFs) often are symptomatic, but misclassification of incident clinical VF may have biased these estimates. There are no comparable data in men. To evaluate the association of incident clinically undiagnosed radiographic VF with back pain symptoms and associated activity limitations, we used data from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study, a prospective cohort study of community-dwelling men aged ≥65 years. A total of 4396 men completed spine X-rays and symptom questionnaires at baseline and visit 2, about 4.6 years later. Incident clinical VFs during this interval were defined by self-reported clinical diagnosis plus community imaging showing a centrally adjudicated ≥1 increase in semiquantitative (SQ) grade in any thoracic or lumbar vertebra versus baseline study X-rays. Incident radiographic VFs (≥1 increase in SQ grade between baseline and visit 2 study X-rays) were categorized as radiographic-only (not clinically diagnosed) or radiographic plus clinical (also clinically diagnosed). Multivariable-adjusted log binomial regression was used to calculate prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Men with incident radiographic plus clinical VF were most likely to have back pain symptoms and associated activity limitation at follow-up. However, versus men without incident VF, those with incident radiographic-only VF also were significantly more likely at follow-up to report any back pain (70% versus 59%; PR, 1.2 [95% CI, 1.1 to 1.3]), severe back pain (8% versus 4%; PR, 1.9 [95% CI, 1.1 to 3.3]), bother from back pain most/all the time (22% versus 13%; PR, 1.7 [95% CI, 1.3 to 2.2]), and limited usual activity from back pain (34% versus 18%; PR, 1.9 [95% CI, 1.5 to 2.4]). Clinically undiagnosed, incident radiographic VFs were associated with an increased likelihood of back pain symptoms and associated activity limitation. Results suggest incident radiographic-only VFs often were symptomatic, and were associated with both new and worsening back pain. Preventing these fractures may reduce back pain and related disability in older men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2263-2268
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Bone and Mineral Research
Volume32
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2017

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
KEE reports receiving payment for serving on a data monitoring board for Merck Sharp & Dohme unrelated to the submitted work. PMC reports nonfinancial support from GSK unrelated to the submitted work. DMK reports grant funding from Unity and consulting fees from Amgen and Kalytera Therapeutics, Inc., all unrelated to the submitted work. All other authors declare they have no conflict of interest to disclose.

Funding Information:
The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study is supported by the NIH. The following institutes provide support: the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), and NIH Roadmap for Medical Research under the following grant numbers: U01 AG027810, U01 AG042124, U01 AG042139, U01 AG042140, U01 AG042143, U01 AG042145, U01 AG042168, U01 AR066160, and UL1 TR000128. This manuscript also is the result of work supported with resources and use of facilities of the Minneapolis VA Health Care System.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research

Keywords

  • AGED
  • BACK PAIN
  • MALE
  • RADIOLOGY
  • VERTEBRAL FRACTURE

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