Association between schizophrenia symptoms and neurocognition on mobility in older adults with schizophrenia

H. Leutwyler, E. Hubbard, D. Jeste, B. Miller, S. Vinogradov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Older persons with schizophrenia develop problems associated with aging, such as poor mobility, at more rapid rates than people without serious mental illness. Decrements in mobility contribute to poor health outcomes. Impaired neurocognitive function and psychiatric symptoms are central aspects of schizophrenia. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between neurocognitive impairment and schizophrenia symptoms to mobility in older adults with schizophrenia.

Methods: A cross-sectional study with 46 older adults with schizophrenia. Participants were assessed on neurocognitive function (MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery), psychiatric symptoms (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale or PANSS), and mobility (Timed Get Up and Go or TGUG test). Pearson's bivariate correlations (two-tailed) and a simultaneous regression model were used.

Results: Lower severity of negative symptoms and faster speed of processing tests were associated with faster TGUG time in bivariate correlations and multivariate regression analyses (p <.05).

Conclusion: Our data suggest that lower negative symptoms and faster speed of processing positively impact mobility in older patients with schizophrenia. Mobility interventions for this population need to target neurocognitive impairment and schizophrenia symptoms for optimal results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1006-1012
Number of pages7
JournalAging and Mental Health
Volume18
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 5 2014

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2014 Taylor & Francis.

Keywords

  • cognitive functioning
  • functional status
  • schizophrenia and paranoid disorders

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