Association between late maternal age and age-related endophenotypes in the Long Life Family Study

Sandra Barral, Stacy L. Andersen, Thomas T. Perls, Harold Bae, Paola Sebastiani, Kaare Christensen, Bharat Thyagarajan, Joseph Lee, Nicole Schupf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Extended maternal age has been suggested as marker of delayed age-associated disabilities. We use the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) offspring generation to investigate the association between extended maternal age at last childbirth and healthy-aging endophenotypes. We hypothesize that women with extended maternal age at last childbirth will exhibit healthier endophenotype profiles compared to younger mothers. The association between maternal age and age-related endophenotypes previously derived in LLFS was assessed using Generalized Estimating Equations to adjust for relatedness. The quartiles of the maternal age at last childbirth were modeled as the independent variables. Univariate analyses tested the association between maternal age at last childbirth and age at clinical assessment, education, field center, Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, depression, stress, smoking and successful pregnancies. Only the variables significantly associated in the univariate analyses were considered in secondary multivariate analyses. Univariate analyses showed that compared to older mothers (age at last birth ≥35), mothers 30 years old or younger at last childbirth are less educated (12 ± 3 years versus 13 ± 3 years) and have a higher frequency of smoking (9% versus 3% for maternal age ≥35). Results showed that older mothers (age at last birth ≥31–34 or ≥ 35) demonstrated significantly better cognitive profiles (p = 0.017 and p = 0.021 respectively) compared with mothers with last childbirth age ≤30. Later maternal age among women from long-life families is associated with a better cognitive profile, supporting the hypothesis that later age at childbirth may be a marker for healthy aging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number136737
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume784
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 27 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The present work has been supported through National Institute of Aging grant U19 AG063893.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors

Keywords

  • Age-related endophenotypes
  • Late maternal age
  • Long-lived families

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