Association between increased serum D-serine and cognitive gains induced by intensive cognitive training in schizophrenia

Rogerio Panizzutti, Melissa A Fisher, Coleman Garrett, Wai Hong Man, Walter Sena, Caroline Madeira, Sophia Vinogradov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neuroscience-guided cognitive training induces significant improvement in cognition in schizophrenia subjects, but the biological mechanisms associated with these changes are unknown. In animals, intensive cognitive activity induces increased brain levels of the NMDA-receptor co-agonist D-serine, a molecular system that plays a role in learning-induced neuroplasticity and that may be hypoactive in schizophrenia. Here, we investigated whether training-induced gains in cognition were associated with increases in serum D-serine in outpatients with schizophrenia. Ninety patients with schizophrenia and 53 healthy controls were assessed on baseline serum D-serine, L-serine, and glycine. Schizophrenia subjects performed neurocognitive tests and were assigned to 50 h of either cognitive training of auditory processing systems (N = 47) or a computer games control condition (N = 43), followed by reassessment of cognition and serum amino acids. At study entry, the mean serum D-serine level was significantly lower in schizophrenia subjects vs. healthy subjects, while the glycine levels were significantly higher. There were no significant changes in these measures at a group level after the intervention. However, in the active training group, increased D-serine was significantly and positively correlated with improvements in global cognition and in Verbal Learning. No such associations were observed in the computer games control subjects, and no such associations were found for glycine. D-Serine may be involved in the neurophysiologic changes induced by cognitive training in schizophrenia. Pharmacologic strategies that target D-serine co-agonism of NMDA-receptor functioning may provide a mechanism for enhancing the behavioral effects of intensive cognitive training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-69
Number of pages7
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume207
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Fingerprint

Serine
Schizophrenia
Serum
Cognition
Glycine
Video Games
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Verbal Learning
Neuronal Plasticity
Healthy Volunteers
Outpatients
Learning
Amino Acids
Brain

Keywords

  • Cognitive remediation
  • NMDA receptors
  • Neuroplasticity
  • Schizophrenia

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Association between increased serum D-serine and cognitive gains induced by intensive cognitive training in schizophrenia. / Panizzutti, Rogerio; Fisher, Melissa A; Garrett, Coleman; Man, Wai Hong; Sena, Walter; Madeira, Caroline; Vinogradov, Sophia.

In: Schizophrenia Research, Vol. 207, 01.05.2019, p. 63-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Panizzutti, Rogerio ; Fisher, Melissa A ; Garrett, Coleman ; Man, Wai Hong ; Sena, Walter ; Madeira, Caroline ; Vinogradov, Sophia. / Association between increased serum D-serine and cognitive gains induced by intensive cognitive training in schizophrenia. In: Schizophrenia Research. 2019 ; Vol. 207. pp. 63-69.
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