Assessing the use of prescription drugs and dietary supplements in obese respondents in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

Laura A. Barrett, Aiwen Xing, Julia Sheffler, Elizabeth Steidley, Terrence J. Adam, Rui Zhang, Zhe He

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction Obesity is a common disease and a known risk factor for many other conditions such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. Treatment options for obesity include lifestyle changes, pharmacotherapy, and surgical interventions such as bariatric surgery. In this study, we examine the use of prescription drugs and dietary supplements by the individuals with obesity. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data 2003–2018. We used multivariate logistic regression to analyze the correlations of demographics and obesity status with the use of prescription drugs and dietary supplement use. We also built machine learning models to classify prescription drug and dietary supplement use using demographic data and obesity status. Results Individuals with obesity are more likely to take cardiovascular agents (OR = 2.095, 95% CI 1.989–2.207) and metabolic agents (OR = 1.658, 95% CI 1.573–1.748) than individuals without obesity. Gender, age, race, poverty income ratio, and insurance status are significantly correlated with dietary supplement use. The best performing model for classifying prescription drug use had the accuracy of 74.3% and the AUROC of 0.82. The best performing model for classifying dietary supplement use had the accuracy of 65.3% and the AUROC of 0.71. Conclusions This study can inform clinical practice and patient education of the use of prescription drugs and dietary supplements and their correlation with obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0269241
JournalPloS one
Volume17
Issue number6 June
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported in part by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number R21AG061431 (ZH); and the University of Florida Clinical and Translational Science Institute, which is supported in part by the NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences under award number UL1TR001427 (ZH); and National Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine (NCCIH) of NIH under Award Number R01AT009457 (RZ). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright: © 2022 Barrett et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Keywords

  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
  • Dietary Supplements
  • Humans
  • Nutrition Surveys
  • Obesity/epidemiology
  • Prescription Drugs/therapeutic use

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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