Assessing the benefits of a parenting skills training program: A theoretical approach to predicting direct and moderating effects

Martha A. Rueter, Rand D. Conger, Suhasini Ramisetty-Mikler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using a theoretical model to ground this investigation, specific hypotheses about factors that moderate the benefits of attending the Preparing for the Drug-Free Years (PDFY) program were tested. PDFY is a skills-training program designed to teach parents and children skills that reduce a child's risk for drug and alcohol use. We hypothesized that high levels of family stress (i.e., marital difficulties or financial concerns) reduce the benefits of program attendance, and that strong pre-program skills (i.e., parental communication, parental negativity, or parent-child relationship quality) increase the benefits of program attendance. These hypotheses were experimentally tested on a sample of families that each included a sixth or seventh grade child. The results for fathers (N = 144) supported the study hypotheses, while mothers (N = 150) who benefited most from program participation showed the weakest pre-program communication skills and reported the greatest marital difficulties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-77
Number of pages11
JournalFamily Relations
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1999

Keywords

  • Family stress
  • Moderating effects
  • Parenting

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