Artificial intelligence in nursing: Priorities and opportunities from an international invitational think-tank of the Nursing and Artificial Intelligence Leadership Collaborative

Charlene Esteban Ronquillo, Laura Maria Peltonen, Lisiane Pruinelli, Charlene H. Chu, Suzanne Bakken, Ana Beduschi, Kenrick Cato, Nicholas Hardiker, Alain Junger, Martin Michalowski, Rune Nyrup, Samira Rahimi, Donald Nigel Reed, Tapio Salakoski, Sanna Salanterä, Nancy Walton, Patrick Weber, Thomas Wiegand, Maxim Topaz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

Aim: To develop a consensus paper on the central points of an international invitational think-tank on nursing and artificial intelligence (AI). Methods: We established the Nursing and Artificial Intelligence Leadership (NAIL) Collaborative, comprising interdisciplinary experts in AI development, biomedical ethics, AI in primary care, AI legal aspects, philosophy of AI in health, nursing practice, implementation science, leaders in health informatics practice and international health informatics groups, a representative of patients and the public, and the Chair of the ITU/WHO Focus Group on Artificial Intelligence for Health. The NAIL Collaborative convened at a 3-day invitational think tank in autumn 2019. Activities included a pre-event survey, expert presentations and working sessions to identify priority areas for action, opportunities and recommendations to address these. In this paper, we summarize the key discussion points and notes from the aforementioned activities. Implications for nursing: Nursing's limited current engagement with discourses on AI and health posts a risk that the profession is not part of the conversations that have potentially significant impacts on nursing practice. Conclusion: There are numerous gaps and a timely need for the nursing profession to be among the leaders and drivers of conversations around AI in health systems. Impact: We outline crucial gaps where focused effort is required for nursing to take a leadership role in shaping AI use in health systems. Three priorities were identified that need to be addressed in the near future: (a) Nurses must understand the relationship between the data they collect and AI technologies they use; (b) Nurses need to be meaningfully involved in all stages of AI: from development to implementation; and (c) There is a substantial untapped and an unexplored potential for nursing to contribute to the development of AI technologies for global health and humanitarian efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3707-3717
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Advanced Nursing
Volume77
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
RN was supported by the Wellcome Trust (213660/Z/18/Z) and the Leverhulme Trust through the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence. SAR receives salary support from a Research Scholar Junior 1 Career Development Award from the Fonds de Recherche du Qu?bec-Sant? (FRQS), and her research programme is supported by Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) Discovery grant no. 2020-05246. KC was supported by Dr. Bakken's Center ?Reducing Health Disparities Through Informatics? NIH grant no. 5T32NR007969-14. Funding and hosting of the Artificial Intelligence for Nursing: Ethical, Legal and Social Implications think tank was provided by Fondation Brocher in Hermance, Switzerland. The Brocher foundation mission is to encourage research on the ethical, legal and social implications of new medical technologies. Its main activities are to host visiting researchers and to organize symposia, workshops and summer or winter academies. More information on the Brocher Foundation program is available at www.brocher.ch. We acknowledge Haley DeForest and Rajbinder Nibber for their support in developing and organizing the think tank events.

Funding Information:
RN was supported by the Wellcome Trust (213660/Z/18/Z) and the Leverhulme Trust through the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence. SAR receives salary support from a Research Scholar Junior 1 Career Development Award from the Fonds de Recherche du Québec‐Santé (FRQS), and her research programme is supported by Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) Discovery grant no. 2020‐05246. KC was supported by Dr. Bakken's Center ‘Reducing Health Disparities Through Informatics’ NIH grant no. 5T32NR007969‐14. Funding and hosting of the Artificial Intelligence for Nursing: Ethical, Legal and Social Implications think tank was provided by Fondation Brocher in Hermance, Switzerland. The Brocher foundation mission is to encourage research on the ethical, legal and social implications of new medical technologies. Its main activities are to host visiting researchers and to organize symposia, workshops and summer or winter academies. More information on the Brocher Foundation program is available at www.brocher.ch .

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Keywords

  • health services research
  • information technology
  • leadership
  • management
  • nurse roles
  • policy
  • politics
  • technology
  • workforce issues

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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