Articulating a trans-boundary infrastructure supply chain greenhouse gas emission footprint for cities: Mathematical relationships and policy relevance

Abel Chavez, Anu Ramaswami

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    57 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    This paper compares the policy relevance and derives mathematical relationships between three approaches for GHG emissions accounting for cities. The three approaches are: (a) Purely-Geographic Inventory, (b) Trans-boundary Community-Wide Infrastructure Footprint (CIF), and (c) Consumption-Based Footprint (CBF). Mathematical derivations coupled with case study of three US communities (Denver Colorado, Routt Colorado, and Sarasota Florida), shows that no one method provides a larger or more holistic estimate of GHG emissions associated with communities. A net-producing community (Routt) demonstrates higher CIF GHG emissions relative to the CBF, while a net-consuming community (Sarasota) yields the opposite. Trade-balanced communities (Denver) demonstrate similar numerical estimates of CIF and CBF, as predicted by the mathematical equations. Knowledge of community typology is important in understanding trans-boundary GHG emission contributions.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)376-384
    Number of pages9
    JournalEnergy Policy
    Volume54
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Mar 1 2013

    Keywords

    • City typology
    • City-scale greenhouse gas footprints
    • Consumption-based carbon footprint
    • Urban infrastructure-based carbon footprints

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