Arthritis self-efficacy and self-efficacy for resisting eating: Relationships to pain, disability, and eating behavior in overweight and obese individuals with osteoarthritic knee pain

Jennifer J. Pells, Rebecca A. Shelby, Francis J. Keefe, Kim E. Dixon, James A. Blumenthal, Lara LaCaille, Jessica M. Tucker, Daniel Schmitt, David S. Caldwell, Virginia B. Kraus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined arthritis self-efficacy and self-efficacy for resisting eating as predictors of pain, disability, and eating behaviors in overweight or obese patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Patients (N = 174) with a body mass index between 25 and 42 completed measures of arthritis-related self-efficacy, weight-related self-efficacy, pain, physical disability, psychological disability, overeating, and demographic and medical information. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted to examine whether arthritis self-efficacy (efficacy for pain control, physical function, and other symptoms) and self-efficacy for resisting eating accounted for significant variance in pain, disability, and eating behaviors after controlling for demographic and medical characteristics. Analyses also tested whether the contributions of self-efficacy were domain specific. Results showed that self-efficacy for pain accounted for 14% (p = .01) of the variance in pain, compared to only 3% accounted for by self-efficacy for physical function and other symptoms. Self-efficacy for physical function accounted for 10% (p = .001) of the variance in physical disability, while self-efficacy for pain and other symptoms accounted for 3%. Self-efficacy for other (emotional) symptoms and resisting eating accounted for 21% (p < .05) of the variance in psychological disability, while self-efficacy for pain control and physical function were not significant predictors. Self-efficacy for resisting eating accounted for 28% (p = .001) of the variance in eating behaviors. Findings indicate that self-efficacy is important in understanding pain and behavioral adjustment in overweight or obese OA patients. Moreover, the contributions of self-efficacy were domain specific. Interventions targeting both arthritis self-efficacy and self-efficacy for resisting eating may be helpful in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)340-347
Number of pages8
JournalPain
Volume136
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2008
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by NIH Grant # 1PO1AR50245-03.

Copyright:
Copyright 2008 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Disability
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Overweight
  • Pain
  • Self-efficacy

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