Are there bi-directional associations between depressive symptoms and C-reactive protein in mid-life women?

Karen A. Matthews, Laura L. Schott, Joyce T. Bromberger, Jill M. Cyranowski, Susan Everson-Rose, Mary Fran Sowers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To test whether depressive symptoms are related to subsequent C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and/or whether CRP levels are related to subsequent depressive symptoms in mid-life women. Methods: Women enrolled in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) were followed for 7 years and had measures of CES-Depression scores and CRP seven times during the follow-up period. Women were pre- or early peri-menopausal at study entry and were of Caucasian, African American, Hispanic, Japanese, or Chinese race/ethnicity. Analyses were restricted to initially healthy women. Results: Longitudinal mixed linear regression models adjusting for age, race, site, time between exams, and outcome variable at year X showed that higher CES-D scores predicted higher subsequent CRP levels and vice versa over a 7-year period. Full multivariate models adjusting for body mass index, physical activity, medications, health conditions, and other covariates showed that higher CRP levels at year X predicted higher CES-D scores at year X + 1, p = 0.03. Higher depressive symptoms predicted higher subsequent CRP levels at marginally significant levels, p = 0.10. Conclusions: Higher CRP levels led to higher subsequent depressive symptoms, albeit the effect was small. The study demonstrates the importance of considering bi-directional relationships for depression and other psychosocial factors and risk for heart disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)96-101
Number of pages6
JournalBrain, Behavior, and Immunity
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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C-Reactive Protein
Depression
Linear Models
Women's Health
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Heart Diseases
Body Mass Index
Exercise
Psychology
Health

Keywords

  • C-reactive protein
  • Depression
  • Inflammation
  • Longitudinal
  • Menopause
  • Women

Cite this

Are there bi-directional associations between depressive symptoms and C-reactive protein in mid-life women? / Matthews, Karen A.; Schott, Laura L.; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Cyranowski, Jill M.; Everson-Rose, Susan; Sowers, Mary Fran.

In: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 96-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matthews, Karen A. ; Schott, Laura L. ; Bromberger, Joyce T. ; Cyranowski, Jill M. ; Everson-Rose, Susan ; Sowers, Mary Fran. / Are there bi-directional associations between depressive symptoms and C-reactive protein in mid-life women?. In: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity. 2010 ; Vol. 24, No. 1. pp. 96-101.
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