Are low income children more physically active when they live in homes with bigger yards? A longitudinal analysis of the NET-Works Study.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study prospectively examined the relationship of home yard-size to objectively measured physical activity over three years among a cohort of 531 low-income pre-school-aged children. An adjusted total-effect association of 12.72 additional minutes per week of moderate/vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was observed for each additional hectare of yard-size. The direct-effect association, adjusting for previous year MVPA, was not statistically significant. This study provides evidence that the private or semi-private space around the house may impact children's’ physical activity. Public health and urban planning practitioners should consider these results to identify built environment solutions for improving MVPA among low-income minority children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102330
JournalHealth and Place
Volume63
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The NET-Works Study was supported by grant U01HD068890 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). Dr. Miller is supported by grant T32CA163184 from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NICHD, NCI; or the National Institutes of Health.

Funding Information:
The NET-Works Study was supported by grant U01HD068890 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) . Dr. Miller is supported by grant T32CA163184 from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) . The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NICHD, NCI; or the National Institutes of Health.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Elsevier Ltd

Copyright:
Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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