Are Family Meal Patterns Associated with Overall Diet Quality during the Transition from Early to Middle Adolescence?

Teri L. Burgess-Champoux, Nicole Larson, Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, Peter J. Hannan, Mary Story

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

122 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine longitudinal associations of participation in regular family meals (≥ 5 meals/week) with eating habits and dietary intake during adolescence. Design: Population-based, longitudinal study (Project EAT: Eating Among Teens). Surveys were completed in Minnesota classrooms at Time 1 (1998-1999) and by mail at Time 2 (2003-2004). Setting: Baseline surveys were completed in Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota, schools and by mail at follow-up. Participants: 677 adolescents (303 males and 374 females) who were in middle school at Time 1 (mean age = 12.8 ± 0.74 years) and high school at Time 2 (mean age = 17.2 ± 0.59 years). Main Outcome Measures: Dietary intake, frequency of meals, and fast-food intake patterns. Analysis: Generalized linear modeling stratified by gender and adjusted for race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and the Time 1 outcome. Results: Regular family meals were positively associated with Time 2 frequency of breakfast, lunch, and dinner meals for males and breakfast and dinner meals for females. Among males, regular family meals were negatively associated with Time 2 fast-food intake. Regular family meals were also positively associated with Time 2 mean daily intakes of vegetables, calcium-rich food, fiber, calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, zinc, folate, and vitamins A and B6 among both genders. Conclusions and Implications: Regular family meals during early adolescence may contribute to the formation of healthful eating habits 5 years later. Parents should be made aware of the importance of shared mealtime experiences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-86
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009

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Meals
Diet
Fast Foods
Breakfast
Eating
Postal Service
Feeding Behavior
Calcium
Lunch
Vitamin B 6
Vitamin A
Folic Acid
Social Class
Vegetables
Magnesium
Longitudinal Studies
Zinc
Potassium
Iron
Parents

Keywords

  • adolescent
  • diet quality
  • family meals
  • meal patterns

Cite this

Are Family Meal Patterns Associated with Overall Diet Quality during the Transition from Early to Middle Adolescence? / Burgess-Champoux, Teri L.; Larson, Nicole; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Hannan, Peter J.; Story, Mary.

In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Vol. 41, No. 2, 01.03.2009, p. 79-86.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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