Are Bonus Pools Driven by Their Incentive Effects? Evidence from Fluctuations in Gainsharing Incentives

Alan Benson, Sima Sajjadiani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Bonus pools, in which a worker’s realized bonus depends both on a worker’s share of the pool (which serves as the incentive) and on the size of the pool (which is largely outside of the worker’s control), are a common method for distributing incentive pay. Using data on the variation in the size of the bonus pool generated by a US manufacturing plant’s gainsharing plan, which varies incentives for quality and worker engagement, the authors evaluate the conditions under which such bonuses have incentive effects. Overall, results are cautionary: The evidence suggests gainsharing’s benefits operate outside of the incentive channel, and incentives may backfire if they are too small or too diluted by group performance metrics. The authors illustrate how random variation in the size of bonus pools offers researchers a powerful, readily available, and underused tool for studying how workers respond to the availability and strength of incentives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)567-599
Number of pages33
JournalILR Review
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

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Incentive effect
Bonus
Incentives
Fluctuations
Workers

Keywords

  • bonus pools
  • gainsharing
  • incentives

Cite this

Are Bonus Pools Driven by Their Incentive Effects? Evidence from Fluctuations in Gainsharing Incentives. / Benson, Alan; Sajjadiani, Sima.

In: ILR Review, Vol. 71, No. 3, 01.05.2018, p. 567-599.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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