Applying trauma-informed practices to the care of refugee and immigrant youth: 10 clinical pearls

Kathleen Miller, Calla R Brown, Maura Shramko, Maria V Svetaz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Immigrant and refugee youth have higher rates of trauma than youth who are not transnational. While youth are incredibly resilient, trauma and toxic stress can result in poor health outcomes that persist throughout life. However, clinical interventions can promote resilience and decrease the negative impact of trauma. This article will review the principles of trauma-informed care and its application for the care of immigrant and refugee youth and their families by sharing concrete and feasible strategies for primary care providers and systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number94
JournalChildren
Volume6
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This project was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under National Research Service Award in Primary Medical Care grant number T32HP22239 (PI: Borowsky), Bureau of Health Workforce. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the US Government. This work was also conducted as part of the University of Minnesota Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH) Interdisciplinary Fellowship at the University of Minnesota, funded through the Maternal Child Health Bureau. This project was also supported by the Eliminating Health Disparities Initiative from the Minnesota Department of Health, and Dr. Svetaz would like to thank the initiative for their ongoing support and collaboration.

Funding Information:
Funding: This project was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under National Research Service Award in Primary Medical Care grant number T32HP22239 (PI: Borowsky), Bureau of Health Workforce. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS, or the US Government. This work was also conducted as part of the University of Minnesota Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH) Interdisciplinary Fellowship at the University of Minnesota, funded through the Maternal Child Health Bureau. This project was also supported by the Eliminating Health Disparities Initiative from the Minnesota Department of Health, and Dr. Svetaz would like to thank the initiative for their ongoing support and collaboration.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords

  • Health care
  • Immigrant
  • Refugee
  • Trauma
  • Youth

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Review

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