Application patterns when applicants know the odds: Implications for selection research and practice

Nathan R Kuncel, David M. Klieger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Unlike previous research that found small differences between population standard deviations and applicant pool standard deviations (P. R. Sackett & D. J. Ostgaard, 1994; D. S. Ones & C. Viswesvaran, 2003), this study revealed a 23% disparity between Law School Admission Test (LSAT) scores of all LSAT test takers and those of LSAT test takers who applied to law school. This study also illustrated robust applicant self-selection behavior across different law school ranks. These findings are important, because predictor scores of applicants who know their scores in advance and perceive small selection ratios necessitate substantially smaller range restriction corrections than those that would be required by population standard deviations. Furthermore, these findings more generally reveal that applicants who know their scores in advance behave quite differently from applicants who do not. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)586-593
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume92
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

Keywords

  • Applicant
  • Cognitive ability
  • Range restriction
  • Standardized test

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