Appeals to Image and Claims About Quality. Understanding the Psychology of Advertising

Mark Snyder, Kenneth G. DeBono

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

335 Scopus citations

Abstract

In three investigations we examined the evaluative and behavioral reactions of high and low self-monitoring individuals to two advertising strategies: appeals to a product's image and claims about a product's quality. High self-monitoring individuals reacted more favorably to image-oriented advertisements, were willing to pay more for products if they were advertised with an image orientation, and were more willing to try a product if it was marketed with an image appeal. By contrast, low self-monitoring individuals reacted more favorably to product-quality-oriented ads, were willing to pay more for products if they were advertised with a quality orientation, and were more willing to try a product if it was marketed with a quality claim. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings for advertising strategies, as well as theoretical implications of these findings for the nature of attitudes, are explored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)586-597
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of personality and social psychology
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1985

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