Apathy and type 2 diabetes among American Indians: Exploring the protective effects of traditional cultural involvement

Amanda E. Carlson, Benjamin D. Aronson, Michael Unzen, Melissa Lewis, Gabrielle J. Benjamin, Melissa L Walls

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this study we examine relationships between traditional cultural factors, apathy, and health- related outcomes among a sample of American Indian adults with type 2 diabetes. Participants completed cross- sectional interviewer- assisted paper and pencil surveys. We tested a proposed model using latent variable path analysis in order to understand the relationships between cultural participation, apathy, frequency of high blood sugar symptoms, and health- related quality of life. The model revealed significant direct effects from cultural participation to apathy, and apathy to both health- related outcomes. No direct effect of cultural participation on either health- related outcome was found; however, cultural participation had a negative indirect effect through apathy on high blood sugar and positive indirect effects on health- related quality of life. This study highlights a potential pathway of cultural involvement to positive diabetes outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)770-783
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of health care for the poor and underserved
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2017

Keywords

  • American indians
  • Apathy
  • Community- based participatory research
  • Culture
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus

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