Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of brachyspira species isolated from swine herds in the United States

Nandita S. Mirajkar, Peter R. Davies, Connie J. Gebhart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Outbreaks of swine dysentery, caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and the recently discovered Brachyspira hampsonii, have reoccurred in North American swine herds since the late 2000s. Additionally, multiple Brachyspira species have been increasingly isolated by North American diagnostic laboratories. In Europe, the reliance on antimicrobial therapy for control of swine dysentery has been followed by reports of antimicrobial resistance over time. The objectives of our study were to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility trends of four Brachyspira species originating from U.S. swine herds and to investigate their associations with the bacterial species, genotypes, and epidemiological origins of the isolates. We evaluated the susceptibility of B. hyodysenteriae, B. hampsonii, Brachyspira pilosicoli, and Brachyspira murdochii to tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, lincomycin, and tylosin by broth microdilution and that to carbadox by agar dilution. In general, Brachyspira species showed high susceptibility to tiamulin, valnemulin, and carbadox, heterogeneous susceptibility to doxycycline, and low susceptibility to lincomycin and tylosin. A trend of decreasing antimicrobial susceptibility by species was observed (B. hampsonii > B. hyodysenteriae > B. murdochii>B. pilosicoli). In general, Brachyspira isolates from the United States were more susceptible to these antimicrobials than were isolates from other countries. Decreased antimicrobial susceptibility was associated with the genotype, stage of production, and production system from which the isolate originated, which highlights the roles of biosecurity and husbandry in disease prevention and control. Finally, this study also highlights the urgent need for Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute-approved clinical breakpoints for Brachyspira species, to facilitate informed therapeutic and control strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2109-2119
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of clinical microbiology
Volume54
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2016

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of brachyspira species isolated from swine herds in the United States'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this