Antimicrobial-resistant bacterial infections from foods of animal origin: understanding and effectively communicating to consumers

G. Donald Ritter, Gary R. Acuff, Gilles Bergeron, Megan W. Bourassa, Benjamin J. Chapman, James S. Dickson, Kenneth Opengart, Matthew Jude Salois, Randall Singer, Carina Storrs

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Consumers are increasingly interested in the attributes of the food they consume. This includes what is in the food and how it was raised; and at least some consumers are willing to pay a premium for products with specific attributes. However, the current plethora of labels on the market does not adequately address this issue; rather than providing actionable information, most labels add to the consumer confusion. In addition, there is a tendency toward “absence labels” that can contribute to a negative consumer perception of conventional products that may or may not include the attribute in question. Communication with consumers about the complex and highly technical issue of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is challenging, and experiences from communication efforts about food safety–related issues demonstrate exactly how challenging this is to communicate clearly. General lessons learned from the science of risk communication can help guide efforts to communicate about the challenging issue of AMR. There are efforts underway to chart out a new approach. A new labeled animal production certification program is under development to provide choice for consumers, while reducing consumer confusion, which mandates antibiotic stewardship practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-49
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1441
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

Bacterial Infections
Labels
Confusion
Animals
Communication
Food
Certification
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Infection

Keywords

  • antibiotics
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • food animals
  • no antibiotics ever

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Review

Cite this

Antimicrobial-resistant bacterial infections from foods of animal origin : understanding and effectively communicating to consumers. / Ritter, G. Donald; Acuff, Gary R.; Bergeron, Gilles; Bourassa, Megan W.; Chapman, Benjamin J.; Dickson, James S.; Opengart, Kenneth; Salois, Matthew Jude; Singer, Randall; Storrs, Carina.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 1441, No. 1, 01.04.2019, p. 40-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Ritter, GD, Acuff, GR, Bergeron, G, Bourassa, MW, Chapman, BJ, Dickson, JS, Opengart, K, Salois, MJ, Singer, R & Storrs, C 2019, 'Antimicrobial-resistant bacterial infections from foods of animal origin: understanding and effectively communicating to consumers', Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1441, no. 1, pp. 40-49. https://doi.org/10.1111/nyas.14091
Ritter, G. Donald ; Acuff, Gary R. ; Bergeron, Gilles ; Bourassa, Megan W. ; Chapman, Benjamin J. ; Dickson, James S. ; Opengart, Kenneth ; Salois, Matthew Jude ; Singer, Randall ; Storrs, Carina. / Antimicrobial-resistant bacterial infections from foods of animal origin : understanding and effectively communicating to consumers. In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2019 ; Vol. 1441, No. 1. pp. 40-49.
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