Anthocyanin production using rough bluegrass treated with high-intensity light

Dominic P. Petrella, James D. Metzger, Joshua J. Blakeslee, Edward J. Nangle, David S. Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Anthocyanins are plant pigments that are in demand for medicinal and industrial uses. However, anthocyanin production is limited due to the harvest potential of the species currently used as anthocyanin sources. Rough bluegrass (Poa trivialis L.) is a perennial turfgrass known for accumulating anthocyanins, and may have the potential to serve as a source of anthocyanins through artificial light treatments. The objectives of this research were to determine optimal light conditions that favor anthocyanin synthesis in rough bluegrass, and to determine the suitability of rough bluegrass as a source of anthocyanins. When exposed to high-intensity white light, rough bluegrass increased anthocyanin content by 100-fold on average, and anthocyanin contents greater than 0.2% of dry tissue weight were observed in some samples. Blue light, at intensities between 150 and 250 μmol·m-2·s-1, was the only wavelength that increased anthocyanin content. However, when red light was applied with blue light at 30% or 50% of the total light intensity, anthocyanin content was increased compared with blue light alone. Further experiments demonstrated that these results may be potentially due to a combination of photosynthetic and photoreceptor-mediated regulation. Rough bluegrass is an attractive anthocyanin production system, since leaf tissue can be harvested while preserving meristematic tissues that allow new leaves to rapidly grow; thereby allowing multiple harvests in a single growing season and greater anthocyanin yields.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1111-1120
Number of pages10
JournalHortScience
Volume51
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Abiotic stress
  • Dye
  • Flavonoid
  • Light-emitting diode (LED)
  • Nutraceutical
  • Poa trivialis

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Anthocyanin production using rough bluegrass treated with high-intensity light'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Petrella, D. P., Metzger, J. D., Blakeslee, J. J., Nangle, E. J., & Gardner, D. S. (2016). Anthocyanin production using rough bluegrass treated with high-intensity light. HortScience, 51(9), 1111-1120. https://doi.org/10.21273/HORTSCI10878-16