Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility as a tool for recognizing core deformation: Reevaluation of the paleomagnetic record of Pleistocene sediments from drill hole OL-92, Owens Lake, California

Joseph Rosenbaum, Richard Reynolds, Joseph Smoot, Robert Meyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

At Owens Lake, California, paleomagnetic data document the Matuyama/Brunhes polarity boundary near the bottom of a 323-m core (OL-92) and display numerous directional fluctuations throughout the Brunhes chron. Many of the intervals of high directional dispersion were previously interpreted to record magnetic excursions. For the upper ~120 m, these interpretations were tested using the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), which typically defines a subhorizontal planar fabric for sediments deposited in quiet water. AMS data from intervals of deformed core, determined from detailed analysis of sedimentary structures, were compared to a reference AMS fabric derived from undisturbed sediment. This comparison shows that changes in the AMS fabric provide a means of screening core samples for deformation and the associated paleomagnetic record for the adverse effects of distortion. For that portion of core OL-92 studied here (about the upper 120 m), the combined analyses of sedimentary structures and AMS data demonstrate that most of the paleomagnetic features, previously interpreted as geomagnetic excursions, are likely the result of core deformation. (C) 2000 Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)415-424
Number of pages10
JournalEarth and Planetary Science Letters
Volume178
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 30 2000
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright:
Copyright 2011 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Anisotropy
  • Deformation
  • Magnetic susceptibility
  • Paleomagnetism
  • Sediments

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