Anesthetic Management During Atrial Septostomy in a Conjoined Thoraco-Omphalopagus Twin With Tricuspid Atresia and d-Transposition of the Great Arteries Before Separation: A Case Report

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Conjoined twins are uncommon with reported incidences of 1 in 30,000-200,000 births. They represent a heterogeneous population in regard to location of joint body parts and presence/extent of internal organ fusion. Positioning, airway management, possible presence of cross-circulation, and the fact that 2 patients require anesthesia for each procedure present significant challenges to the anesthesiologist. We report the anesthetic care of a conjoined twin set in which one of the patients presented with tricuspid atresia, d-transposition of the great arteries, and both atrial and ventricular septal defect. A balloon atrial septostomy was performed to allow survival after a separation procedure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)298-301
Number of pages4
JournalA&A practice
Volume10
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

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Conjoined Twins
Tricuspid Atresia
Transposition of Great Vessels
Anesthetics
Cross Circulation
Airway Management
Atrial Heart Septal Defects
Ventricular Heart Septal Defects
Human Body
Anesthesia
Joints
Parturition
Survival
Incidence
Population
Anesthesiologists

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

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title = "Anesthetic Management During Atrial Septostomy in a Conjoined Thoraco-Omphalopagus Twin With Tricuspid Atresia and d-Transposition of the Great Arteries Before Separation: A Case Report",
abstract = "Conjoined twins are uncommon with reported incidences of 1 in 30,000-200,000 births. They represent a heterogeneous population in regard to location of joint body parts and presence/extent of internal organ fusion. Positioning, airway management, possible presence of cross-circulation, and the fact that 2 patients require anesthesia for each procedure present significant challenges to the anesthesiologist. We report the anesthetic care of a conjoined twin set in which one of the patients presented with tricuspid atresia, d-transposition of the great arteries, and both atrial and ventricular septal defect. A balloon atrial septostomy was performed to allow survival after a separation procedure.",
author = "Martina Richtsfeld and Mojca Konia and Gurumurthy Hiremath and Benjamin Kloesel",
year = "2018",
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AU - Hiremath, Gurumurthy

AU - Kloesel, Benjamin

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AB - Conjoined twins are uncommon with reported incidences of 1 in 30,000-200,000 births. They represent a heterogeneous population in regard to location of joint body parts and presence/extent of internal organ fusion. Positioning, airway management, possible presence of cross-circulation, and the fact that 2 patients require anesthesia for each procedure present significant challenges to the anesthesiologist. We report the anesthetic care of a conjoined twin set in which one of the patients presented with tricuspid atresia, d-transposition of the great arteries, and both atrial and ventricular septal defect. A balloon atrial septostomy was performed to allow survival after a separation procedure.

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