Anatomy and function of the orbital frontal cortex, II: Function and relevance to obsessive-compulsive disorder

David Harold Zald, Suck Won Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

116 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors review neurophysiological, neurobehavioral, and neuropsychological investigations of the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) in human and non-human primates. The article critically examines the role of the OFC in 1) recognition of reinforcers; 2) stimulus-reinforcer learning; 3) modulation of responses based on changes in reinforcement contingencies; 4) emotions, social behavior, and autonomic regulation; 5) mnemonic functions; and 6) rule learning. Examining these functional areas with reference to the OFC's anatomical and neurophysiological properties, the authors suggest ways in which the OFC might contribute to obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-261
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

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