Analysis of risk factors for outcomes after unrelated cord blood transplantation in adults with lymphoid malignancies: A study by the Eurocord-Netcord and Lymphoma Working Party of the European Group for blood and marrow transplantation

Celso A. Rodrigues, Guillermo Sanz, Claudio G. Brunstein, Jaime Sanz, John E. Wagner, Marc Renaud, Marcos De Lima, Mitchell S. Cairo, Sabine Fürst, Bernard Rio, Christopher Dalley, Enric Carreras, Jean Luc Harousseau, Mohamad Mohty, Denis Taveira, Peter Dreger, Anna Sureda, Eliane Gluckman, Vanderson Rocha

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163 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To determine risk factors of umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) for patients with lymphoid malignancies. Patients and Methods: We evaluated 104 adult patients (median age, 41 years) who underwent unrelated donor UCBT for lymphoid malignancies. UCB grafts were two-antigen human leukocyte antigen-mismatched in 68%, and were composed of one (n = 78) or two (n = 26) units. Diagnoses were non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, n = 61), Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL, n = 29), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, n = 14), with 87% having advanced disease and 60% having experienced failure with a prior autologous transplant. Sixty-four percent of patients received a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen and 46% low-dose total-body irradiation (TBI). Median follow-up was 18 months. Results: Cumulative incidence of neutrophil engraftment was 84% by day 60, with greater engraftment in recipients of higher CD34+ kg/cell dose (P = .0004). CI of non-relapse-related mortality (NRM) was 28% at 1 year, with a lower risk in patients treated with low-dose total-body irradiation (TBI; P = .03). Cumulative incidence of relapse or progression was 31% at 1 year, with a lower risk in recipients of double-unit UCBT (P = .03). The probability of progression-free survival (PFS) was 40% at 1 year, with improved survival in those with chemosensitive disease (49% v 34%; P = .03), who received conditioning regimens containing low-dose TBI (60% v 23%; P = .001), and higher nucleated cell dose (49% v 21%; P = .009). Conclusion: UCBT is a viable treatment for adults with advanced lymphoid malignancies. Chemosensitive disease, use of low-dose TBI, and higher cell dose were factors associated with significantly better outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)256-263
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 10 2009

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