Analgesic use and ovarian cancer risk: An analysis in the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium

Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium (OC3)

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    27 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Background: Aspirin use is associated with reduced risk of several cancers. A pooled analysis of 12 case-control studies showed a 10% decrease in ovarian cancer risk with regular aspirin use, which was stronger for daily and low-dose users. To prospectively investigate associations of analgesic use with ovarian cancer, we analyzed data from 13 studies in the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium (OC3). Methods: The current study included 758 829 women who at study enrollment self-reported analgesic use, among whom 3514 developed ovarian cancer. Using Cox regression, we assessed associations between frequent medication use and risk of ovarian cancer. Dose and duration were also evaluated. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Women who used aspirin almost daily (≥6 days/wk) vs infrequent/nonuse experienced a 10% reduction in ovarian cancer risk (rate ratio [RR] = 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.82 to 1.00, P = .05). Frequent use (≥4 days/wk) of aspirin (RR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.88 to 1.03), nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs; RR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.90 to 1.11), or acetaminophen (RR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.88 to 1.24) was not associated with risk. Daily acetaminophen use (RR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.00 to 1.65, P = .05) was associated with elevated ovarian cancer risk. Risk estimates for frequent, long-term (10+ years) use of aspirin (RR = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.98 to 1.34) or nonaspirin NSAIDs (RR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.84 to 1.68) weremodestly elevated, although not statistically significantly so. Conclusions: This large, prospective analysis suggests that women who use aspirin daily have a slightly lower risk of developing ovarian cancer (∼10% lower than infrequent/nonuse)-similar to the risk reduction observed in case-control analyses. The observed potential elevated risks for 10+ years of frequent aspirin and NSAID use require further study but could be due to confounding by medical indications for use or variation in drug dosing.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)137-145
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
    Volume111
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

    Bibliographical note

    Funding Information:
    This work was supported by Department of Defense Ovarian Cancer Research Program grant W81XWH-12-1-0561. The UKBGS thanks Breast Cancer Now and the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) for support and funding. The ICR acknowledges National Health Service funding to the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre. K05CA154337 from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and Office of Dietary Supplements (VITAL); R01 CA39742 (Iowa Women's Health Study); research grants from the Swedish Research Council and Swedish Cancer Foundation (SMC, WLHS); UM1 CA164973 (Multiethnic Cohort Study [MEC]); NIH/NCI UM1 CA182876 (SCHS); UM1 CA186107, P01 CA87969, UM1 CA176726, R01 CA67262 (Nurses' Health Study, Nurses' Health Study II); and NIEHS Intramural Research Program (Project Z01-ES044005 to DPS). The Womens Health Initiative (WHI) program is funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/DHHS, through contracts HHSN268201100046C, HHSN268201100001C, HHSN268201100002C, HHSN268201100003C, HHSN268201100004C, and HHSN271201100004C. NCI Intramural Research Program.

    Funding Information:
    This work was supported by Department of Defense Ovarian Cancer Research Program grant W81XWH-12-1-0561. The UKBGS thanks Breast Cancer Now and the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) for support and funding. The ICR acknowledges National Health Service funding to the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre. K05CA154337 from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and Office of Dietary Supplements (VITAL); R01 CA39742 (Iowa Women’s Health Study); research grants from the Swedish Research Council and Swedish Cancer Foundation (SMC, WLHS); UM1 CA164973 (Multiethnic Cohort Study [MEC]); NIH/NCI UM1 CA182876 (SCHS); UM1 CA186107, P01 CA87969, UM1 CA176726, R01 CA67262 (Nurses’ Health Study, Nurses’ Health Study II); and NIEHS Intramural Research Program (Project Z01-ES044005 to DPS). The Womens Health Initiative (WHI) program is funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/DHHS, through contracts HHSN268201100046C, HHSN268201100001C, HHSN268201100002C, HHSN268201100003C, HHSN268201100004C, and HHSN271201100004C. NCI Intramural Research Program.

    Publisher Copyright:
    © The Author(s) 2018.

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Analgesic use and ovarian cancer risk: An analysis in the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this