An unwelcomed digital visitor in the classroom: The longitudinal impact of online racial discrimination on academic motivation

Brendesha M. Tynes, Juan Del Toro, Fantasy T. Lozada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Online racial discrimination experiences often reflect attacks on the humanity and intelligence of members of specific racial groups (e.g., African Americans and Latinos). Such experiences may have detrimental effects on academic outcomes over time. Changes in reports of online racial discrimination and academic motivation were examined among a sample of 418 African American (n = 257) and Latino (n = 161) youth in Grades 6-12. Latent growth models with parallel processes revealed that adolescents reported increases in online racial discrimination over time yet relative stability in academic motivation. Elevated rates of online racial discrimination were related to decreases in adolescents' academic motivation. This was the case even after adjusting for teacher discrimination and baseline grade point average. In addition, high initial levels of academic motivation were related to increases in adolescents' reports of online racial discrimination. Findings highlight the importance of understanding racial discrimination in online contexts when examining how race-related experiences affect the academic adjustment of adolescents of color.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)407-424
Number of pages18
JournalSchool Psychology Review
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2015
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01HD061584

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright 2015 by the National Association of School Psychologists.

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