An outbreak of salmonella enterica serotype choleraesuis in goitered gazelle (Gazella subgutrosa subgutrosa) and a Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus)

Tiffany M. Wolf, Arno Wünschmann, Brenda Morningstar-Shaw, Gayle C. Pantlin, James M. Rasmussen, Rachel L. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

An outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis enteritis occurred in two juvenile goitered gazelles and an adult Malayan tapir over a period of 5 wk at the Minnesota Zoo. Diagnosis was made postmortem on one gazelle and one tapir, and a second gazelle was diagnosed via fecal culture. The death of the tapir was attributed to S. enterica serovar Choleraesuis septicemia, while salmonellosis was considered to be a contributing factor besides ostertagiasis for the death of one goitered gazelle and for the diarrhea of another goitered gazelle. A third gazelle became ill in the same time period, but Salmonella infection was not confirmed by culture. All exhibited the clinical signs of profuse, watery diarrhea. The gazelles developed a protein-losing enteropathy, and the tapir showed signs of sepsis and endotoxemia. Serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed the Salmonella isolates to be indistinguishable from each other. One year prior to this outbreak, Salmonella sp. was cultured from a Visayan warty pig (Sus cebifrons) housed in the same building as the tapir. After further investigation into the outbreak, spread of this pathogen was speculated to be associated with human movement across animal areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)694-699
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
Volume42
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

Keywords

  • Gazella subgutrosa subgutrosa
  • Malayan tapir
  • Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis
  • Tapirus indicus
  • goitered gazelle
  • salmonellosis

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