An outbreak of measles among unvaccinated young adults and measles seroprevalence study: Implications for measles outbreak control in adult populations

Kristen R. Ehresmann, Norman Crouch, Paula M. Henry, John M. Hunt, Tonia L. Habedank, Robert Bowman, Kristine A. Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Measles incidence has declined significantly in the United States since the 1989-1991 resurgence. Several conditions, including pockets of underimmunization, international importation, and the inability to rapidly detect and contain cases, represent potential threats to this success. During the 1995-1996 winter holiday season, the Minnesota Department of Health investigated an outbreak of measles among unvaccinated young adults affiliated with a religious community. A total of 26 outbreak-associated cases of measles were identified; most case patients (65%) were 20-29 years of age (range, 18 months to 35 years). Although case patients had multiple opportunities to expose the general public, no subsequent transmission was identified despite extensive surveillance efforts. A measles seroprevalence survey of 508 Minnesota blood donors aged 20-39 years was conducted; 91% had serologjcal evidence of immunity to measles. Our findings illustrate that high levels of population immunity can prevent transmission of measles, despite multiple opportunities for exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S104-S107
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume189
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2004

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