An international human rights perspective on maternal criminal justice involvement in the United States

Lorie S. Goshin, Joyce A. Arditti, Danielle H. Dallaire, Rebecca J Shlafer, Allison Hollihan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Internationally and historically unprecedented numbers of women in the United States are under criminal justice supervision in jails, prisons, and the community. Pregnant women and mothers with minor children comprise a large proportion of this population. The rise in criminal justice oversight and incarceration rates has differentially impacted a highly vulnerable population of women and children. This article outlines an international human rights perspective on the criminal justice involvement of pregnant women and mothers with minor children, and describes common and broadly accepted U.S. criminal justice practices in the areas of pregnancy, birth, and contact with children that differ from a rights-based approach. Using the United Nations-developed Bangkok Rules and existing research as a foundation, the authors conclude by advancing recommendations for more humane approaches to pregnant and parenting women and their children that would bring the United States more closely in line with international standards. This article capitalizes on the increased attention currently being placed on the U.S. criminal justice system to highlight continued problems and provide humane solutions that draw on international approaches while also fitting a U.S. context.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-67
Number of pages15
JournalPsychology, Public Policy, and Law
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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Criminal Law
human rights
justice
Mothers
Pregnant Women
United Nations
Prisons
Parenting
Vulnerable Populations
correctional institution
supervision
pregnancy
UNO
Parturition
contact
Pregnancy
Research
Population
community

Keywords

  • Children
  • Human rights
  • Mothers
  • Prison
  • Women's health

Cite this

An international human rights perspective on maternal criminal justice involvement in the United States. / Goshin, Lorie S.; Arditti, Joyce A.; Dallaire, Danielle H.; Shlafer, Rebecca J; Hollihan, Allison.

In: Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.02.2017, p. 53-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goshin, Lorie S. ; Arditti, Joyce A. ; Dallaire, Danielle H. ; Shlafer, Rebecca J ; Hollihan, Allison. / An international human rights perspective on maternal criminal justice involvement in the United States. In: Psychology, Public Policy, and Law. 2017 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 53-67.
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