An Exploration of How Family Dinners Are Served and How Service Style Is Associated With Dietary and Weight Outcomes in Children

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To explore how families serve meals and how different service styles are associated with responsive feeding and child dietary and weight outcomes. Methods Baseline data from a subset (n = 75) of randomized controlled trial participants (Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment (HOME) Plus study, aged 8–12 years) were analyzed using a series of linear regression models. Adjusted means (95% confidence intervals) and beta coefficients (SEs) are presented. Results Families were most likely to report plated meal service (36% of families), followed by family-style (29%). Family-style was significantly associated with a lower mean level of food restriction (P =.01). No significant associations were observed between style of meal service and child outcomes (all P >.05). Conclusions and Implications Although plated meal service may seem like a desirable strategy for ensuring that children eat a healthier diet, the current results did not provide support for this association. Evidence was found to support the use of family-style meal service to promote the use of responsive feeding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)513-518.e1
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume49
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Meals
Weights and Measures
Linear Models
Healthy Volunteers
Randomized Controlled Trials
Confidence Intervals
Food

Keywords

  • child
  • family meals
  • family-style
  • meal service style
  • weight status

Cite this

@article{2132ad6b20244b649f36b221df4c9a34,
title = "An Exploration of How Family Dinners Are Served and How Service Style Is Associated With Dietary and Weight Outcomes in Children",
abstract = "Objective To explore how families serve meals and how different service styles are associated with responsive feeding and child dietary and weight outcomes. Methods Baseline data from a subset (n = 75) of randomized controlled trial participants (Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment (HOME) Plus study, aged 8–12 years) were analyzed using a series of linear regression models. Adjusted means (95{\%} confidence intervals) and beta coefficients (SEs) are presented. Results Families were most likely to report plated meal service (36{\%} of families), followed by family-style (29{\%}). Family-style was significantly associated with a lower mean level of food restriction (P =.01). No significant associations were observed between style of meal service and child outcomes (all P >.05). Conclusions and Implications Although plated meal service may seem like a desirable strategy for ensuring that children eat a healthier diet, the current results did not provide support for this association. Evidence was found to support the use of family-style meal service to promote the use of responsive feeding.",
keywords = "child, family meals, family-style, meal service style, weight status",
author = "Loth, {Katie A.} and Melissa Horning and Sarah Friend and Dianne Neumark-Sztainer and Jayne Fulkerson",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jneb.2017.03.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "49",
pages = "513--518.e1",
journal = "Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior",
issn = "1499-4046",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
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T1 - An Exploration of How Family Dinners Are Served and How Service Style Is Associated With Dietary and Weight Outcomes in Children

AU - Loth, Katie A.

AU - Horning, Melissa

AU - Friend, Sarah

AU - Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

AU - Fulkerson, Jayne

PY - 2017/6/1

Y1 - 2017/6/1

N2 - Objective To explore how families serve meals and how different service styles are associated with responsive feeding and child dietary and weight outcomes. Methods Baseline data from a subset (n = 75) of randomized controlled trial participants (Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment (HOME) Plus study, aged 8–12 years) were analyzed using a series of linear regression models. Adjusted means (95% confidence intervals) and beta coefficients (SEs) are presented. Results Families were most likely to report plated meal service (36% of families), followed by family-style (29%). Family-style was significantly associated with a lower mean level of food restriction (P =.01). No significant associations were observed between style of meal service and child outcomes (all P >.05). Conclusions and Implications Although plated meal service may seem like a desirable strategy for ensuring that children eat a healthier diet, the current results did not provide support for this association. Evidence was found to support the use of family-style meal service to promote the use of responsive feeding.

AB - Objective To explore how families serve meals and how different service styles are associated with responsive feeding and child dietary and weight outcomes. Methods Baseline data from a subset (n = 75) of randomized controlled trial participants (Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment (HOME) Plus study, aged 8–12 years) were analyzed using a series of linear regression models. Adjusted means (95% confidence intervals) and beta coefficients (SEs) are presented. Results Families were most likely to report plated meal service (36% of families), followed by family-style (29%). Family-style was significantly associated with a lower mean level of food restriction (P =.01). No significant associations were observed between style of meal service and child outcomes (all P >.05). Conclusions and Implications Although plated meal service may seem like a desirable strategy for ensuring that children eat a healthier diet, the current results did not provide support for this association. Evidence was found to support the use of family-style meal service to promote the use of responsive feeding.

KW - child

KW - family meals

KW - family-style

KW - meal service style

KW - weight status

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