An evaluation of computerized attention and executive function measures for use with school age children with neurofibromatosis type 1

Sara K. Pardej, Christina L. Casnar, Brianna D. Yund, Bonita P. Klein-Tasman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present study investigated the performance of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 on computerized assessments of attention and executive function. Relations to ADHD symptomatology were also examined. Participants included 37 children (20 male) with NF1 (9–13 years; Mage = 11.02). Participants completed the NIH Toolbox Dimensional Change Card Sort, List Sort Working Memory (LSWM), and Flanker tasks, as well as Cogstate Identification and One Back tests. ADHD symptomatology was assessed using the K-SADS. Average performance was significantly different from the normative mean on every measure, except LSWM. The NIH Toolbox Flanker and Cogstate Identification tasks detected the highest proportion of participants with at least mild difficulty, and the Cogstate Identification task detected the highest proportion of participants with severe difficulty. Analyses revealed significant relations with ADHD symptomatology for two NIH toolbox tasks. The various computerized measures of attention and executive function offer different information when working with school age children with NF1. The NIH Flanker may offer the most room for change and offers face validity, which may be beneficial for clinical trials research. However, the LSWM shows most support for relations with behavioral indicators of attention and executive challenges.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalChild Neuropsychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • NF1
  • Neurofibromatosis type 1
  • attention
  • computerized assessment
  • executive function

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