An efficient finite-rate chemistry model for a preconditioned compressible flow solver and its comparison with the flamelet/progress-variable model

Suo Yang, Xingjian Wang, Hongfa Huo, Wenting Sun, Vigor Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An efficient finite-rate chemistry (FRC) model is developed for a preconditioned compressible flow solver. The model uses a point-implicit stiff ODE solver and a correlated dynamic adaptive chemistry algorithm. With respect to the conventional FRC model using the double precision variable coefficient stiff ODE solver, the present work achieves an 8.6 times speed-up for chemistry calculation, and 6.4 times for total computation, when using a 20-species kinetics mechanism for methane/air flames. As an example problem, a piloted partially premixed methane/air jet flame (Sandia Flame D), with a relatively low level of local extinction and re-ignition, is considered, and both the new FRC-large eddy simulation (LES) and flamelet/progress-variable (FPV)-LES are conducted. The FRC-LES approach predicts larger time-averaged flame length, and better agrees with the measured value. This is because the instantaneous high-temperature zone for the FPV-LES case is significantly smaller than it's FRC-LES counterpart, especially in the downstream region. For spatial distribution of time-averaged statistics, the FPV-LES result agrees with the experimental data better. For conditional statistics in the mixture fraction space, the FRC-LES approach provides significantly better predictions. Near the stoichiometric region, in comparison with experimental data and the FRC-LES results, the FPV-LES approach predicts higher radical generation, but lower CO generation and heat release.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-182
Number of pages11
JournalCombustion and Flame
Volume210
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

compressible flow
Compressible flow
Large eddy simulation
large eddy simulation
chemistry
flames
Methane
methane
Statistics
statistics
air jets
Carbon Monoxide
Air
Spatial distribution
ignition
Ignition
spatial distribution
extinction
heat
Kinetics

Keywords

  • Finite-rate chemistry
  • Flamelet/progress-variable
  • Large eddy simulation
  • Turbulent combustion

Cite this

An efficient finite-rate chemistry model for a preconditioned compressible flow solver and its comparison with the flamelet/progress-variable model. / Yang, Suo; Wang, Xingjian; Huo, Hongfa; Sun, Wenting; Yang, Vigor.

In: Combustion and Flame, Vol. 210, 01.12.2019, p. 172-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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