Amplitude modulation detection by human listeners in reverberant sound fields: Carrier bandwidth effects and binaural versus monaural comparison

Pavel Zahorik, Duck O. Kim, Shigeyuki Kuwada, Paul W. Anderson, Eugene Brandewie, Regina Collecchia, Nirmal Srinivasan

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous work [Zahorik et al., POMA, 12, 050005 (2011)] has reported that for a broadband noise carrier signal in a simulated reverberant sound field, human sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) is higher than would be predicted based on the broadband acoustical modulation transfer function (MTF) of the listening environment. Interpretation of this result was complicated by the fact that acoustical MTFs of rooms are often quite different for different carrier frequency regions, and listeners may have selectively responded to advantageous carrier frequency regions where the effective acoustic modulation loss due to the room was less than indicated by a broadband acoustic MTF analysis. Here, AM sensitivity testing and acoustic MTF analyses were expanded to include narrowband noise carriers (1-octave and 1/3-octave bands centered at 4 kHz), as well as monaural and binaural listening conditions. Narrowband results were found to be consistent with broadband results: In a reverberant sound field, human AM sensitivity is higher than indicated by the acoustical MTFs. The effect was greatest for modulation frequencies above 32 Hz and was present whether the stimulation was monaural or binaural. These results are suggestive of mechanisms that functionally enhance modulation in reverberant listening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number050002
JournalProceedings of Meetings on Acoustics
Volume15
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Event163rd Meeting Acoustical Society of America/ACOUSTCS 2012 - Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Duration: May 13 2012May 18 2012

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