Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring for clinical applications and basic science

Germaine G Cornelissen-Guillaume, Cathy Lee Gierke, Yoshihiko Watanabe, Larry A. Beaty, Jarmila Siegelova, Alain Delcourt, Christian Deruyck, Ram B. Singh, Miguel A. Revilla, Kuniaki Otsuka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Monitoring for spans longer than 24 hours, preferably for 7 days at the outset, has been advocated to obtain more reliable estimates of the circadian characteristics of blood pressure and heart rate. Herein, using data from a chronotherapy trial, we address the desirability of complementing the global analysis of the entire record by the computation of daily sphygmochrons to gain a better assessment of the day-to-day variability in the circadian patterns of these variables. An algorithm for defining optimal spans covering approximately a day (while using all data in a record) is developed and implemented as a script in R. Combined with criteria to determine whether the data in a given span are sufficient to yield reliable estimates of the circadian characteristics of blood pressure and heart rate, results from this approach are compared by means of Bland-Altman plots to those stemming from considering 24-hour spans. Applications of daily sphygmochrons are wide-ranging, in patients as well as in healthy people, for clinical applications, for health maintenance and surveillance, for a better understanding of how blood pressure and heart rate are affected by a variety of factors in everyday life, such as nutrition, exercise, smoking, salt and alcohol intake, and for learning how human physiology is influenced by space-terrestrial weather.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-117
Number of pages11
JournalWorld Heart Journal
Volume7
Issue number2
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Keywords

  • Bland-Altman plot
  • Circadian
  • Daily sphygmochrons
  • Day-to-day variability
  • Individualized chronotherapy
  • Vascular Variability Disorders (VVDs)

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    Cornelissen-Guillaume, G. G., Gierke, C. L., Watanabe, Y., Beaty, L. A., Siegelova, J., Delcourt, A., Deruyck, C., Singh, R. B., Revilla, M. A., & Otsuka, K. (2015). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring for clinical applications and basic science. World Heart Journal, 7(2), 107-117.