Alternative smart materials

Richard D. James, Manfred Wuttig

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Presently, there are three types of smart materials available, ferroelectric-magnetic and -elastic materials. Prototypes of the three are PZT ceramics, Terfenol-D and Nitinol. Their advantages and disadvantages are well known: Ferroelectric materials are characterized by a large elastic constant and moderate actuation strain, and their dynamical response is excellent. Some antiferroelectrics feature a larger actuation strain. Terfenol-D displays similar mechanical characteristics but its dynamical response is limited by eddy currents. This limitation can be overcome in composites. Nitinol and similar shape memory alloys feature a large elastic constant and actuation strain but suffer from inferior dynamical response which can be overcome in small sections. The ideal actuation material would display a large actuation energy and superior dynamical response. Shape memory type materials display the largest actuation strains known. It is thus natural to inquire into the possibility actuating these alloys with a magnetic field to improve their dynamical performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsVasundara V. Varadan, Jagdish Chandra
Pages420-426
Number of pages7
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
EventSmart Structures and Materials 1996: Mathematics and Control in Smart Structures - San Diego, CA, USA
Duration: Feb 26 1996Feb 29 1996

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume2715

Other

OtherSmart Structures and Materials 1996: Mathematics and Control in Smart Structures
CitySan Diego, CA, USA
Period2/26/962/29/96

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  • Cite this

    James, R. D., & Wuttig, M. (1996). Alternative smart materials. In V. V. Varadan, & J. Chandra (Eds.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (pp. 420-426). (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 2715).