Altering the School Breakfast Environment Reduces Barriers to School Breakfast Participation Among Diverse Rural Youth

Mary O. Hearst, Amy Shanafelt, Qi Wang, Robert Leduc, Marilyn S. Nanney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The purpose is to determine if altering school breakfast policies and the school breakfast environment will positively impact adolescent beliefs of the barriers and benefits of eating breakfast. METHODS: There were 904 adolescents from 16 rural high schools, Minnesota, in the BreakFAST Study who reported eating breakfast fewer than 4 times per week at baseline. Schools were randomized to intervention (N = 8 schools) or delayed intervention (N = 8) condition. The intervention lasted 1 school year. Students completed an online survey of beliefs of barriers and benefits to eating breakfast at baseline and follow-up. Summative scales were created. Bivariate and multivariate linear regression, accounting for clustering by school, was performed using SAS. Sex interaction was tested. Models tested the effect of the intervention on change in summative scales from baseline to follow -up. RESULTS: Participants were 54% female, 69.1% white, 36.6% eligible for free or reduced-price meals (FRM) and 13.1% of families received public assistance. The change in reported barriers was significantly different in intervention versus control schools (Net difference = 1.0, p =.03). There was no intervention effect of perceived benefits. CONCLUSIONS: A school-based policy and environmental change intervention can successfully reduce perceived barriers to eating school breakfast.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages3-8
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of School Health
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

school policy
Breakfast
adolescent
participation
school
eating behavior
Eating
Public Assistance
Participation
Environmental Policy
School Health Services
meals
online survey
Cluster Analysis
Meals
Linear Models
assistance
Students
regression

Keywords

  • adolescent
  • intervention
  • school breakfast
  • school policy

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Altering the School Breakfast Environment Reduces Barriers to School Breakfast Participation Among Diverse Rural Youth. / Hearst, Mary O.; Shanafelt, Amy; Wang, Qi; Leduc, Robert; Nanney, Marilyn S.

In: Journal of School Health, Vol. 88, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 3-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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