Alopecia Areata: The Clinical Situation

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

  • 1 Citations

Abstract

In the absence of an approved treatment by the US Food and Drug Administration, choosing one of the many off-label treatments available for a child, teen, or adult with alopecia areata (AA) can be challenging. The physician or midlevel provider treating a patient with AA needs to take into consideration the age of the patient, location of hair loss, disease extent and activity, and any ongoing medical or psychological issues. Many patients and their families have now also heard the “buzz” about evolving research, particularly with JAK inhibitors, for the treatment of AA. This means that today's clinic visit with the AA patient should include not only a discussion about traditionally used off-label treatments but also evolving therapies and clinical research opportunities.

LanguageEnglish (US)
PagesS9-S11
JournalJournal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Alopecia Areata
Hair Diseases
Therapeutics
Alopecia
United States Food and Drug Administration
Ambulatory Care
Research
Psychology
Physicians

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Cite this

Alopecia Areata : The Clinical Situation. / Hordinsky, Maria K.

In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. S9-S11.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

@article{b207ec922f954c6eadfe3a8bae2b8b9d,
title = "Alopecia Areata: The Clinical Situation",
abstract = "In the absence of an approved treatment by the US Food and Drug Administration, choosing one of the many off-label treatments available for a child, teen, or adult with alopecia areata (AA) can be challenging. The physician or midlevel provider treating a patient with AA needs to take into consideration the age of the patient, location of hair loss, disease extent and activity, and any ongoing medical or psychological issues. Many patients and their families have now also heard the “buzz” about evolving research, particularly with JAK inhibitors, for the treatment of AA. This means that today's clinic visit with the AA patient should include not only a discussion about traditionally used off-label treatments but also evolving therapies and clinical research opportunities.",
author = "Hordinsky, {Maria K}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jisp.2017.10.015",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "S9--S11",
journal = "The journal of investigative dermatology. Symposium proceedings / the Society for Investigative Dermatology, Inc. [and] European Society for Dermatological Research",
issn = "1087-0024",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Alopecia Areata

T2 - The journal of investigative dermatology. Symposium proceedings / the Society for Investigative Dermatology, Inc. [and] European Society for Dermatological Research

AU - Hordinsky, Maria K

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - In the absence of an approved treatment by the US Food and Drug Administration, choosing one of the many off-label treatments available for a child, teen, or adult with alopecia areata (AA) can be challenging. The physician or midlevel provider treating a patient with AA needs to take into consideration the age of the patient, location of hair loss, disease extent and activity, and any ongoing medical or psychological issues. Many patients and their families have now also heard the “buzz” about evolving research, particularly with JAK inhibitors, for the treatment of AA. This means that today's clinic visit with the AA patient should include not only a discussion about traditionally used off-label treatments but also evolving therapies and clinical research opportunities.

AB - In the absence of an approved treatment by the US Food and Drug Administration, choosing one of the many off-label treatments available for a child, teen, or adult with alopecia areata (AA) can be challenging. The physician or midlevel provider treating a patient with AA needs to take into consideration the age of the patient, location of hair loss, disease extent and activity, and any ongoing medical or psychological issues. Many patients and their families have now also heard the “buzz” about evolving research, particularly with JAK inhibitors, for the treatment of AA. This means that today's clinic visit with the AA patient should include not only a discussion about traditionally used off-label treatments but also evolving therapies and clinical research opportunities.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85039931998&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85039931998&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jisp.2017.10.015

DO - 10.1016/j.jisp.2017.10.015

M3 - Comment/debate

VL - 19

SP - S9-S11

JO - The journal of investigative dermatology. Symposium proceedings / the Society for Investigative Dermatology, Inc. [and] European Society for Dermatological Research

JF - The journal of investigative dermatology. Symposium proceedings / the Society for Investigative Dermatology, Inc. [and] European Society for Dermatological Research

SN - 1087-0024

IS - 1

ER -